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the wireless messaging news

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Wireless News Aggregation

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Friday — March 21, 2014 — Issue No. 598

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Paging and Wireless Messaging Home Page image Newsletter Archive image Carrier Directory image Recommended Products and Services
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Reference Papers Consulting Glossary of Terms Send an e-mail to Brad Dye

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Dear Friends of Wireless Messaging,

My grandmother used to say “If you don't like the weather in Illinois, just wait until tomorrow.” That has certainly been true here lately. One day 72º F. and the next day 32º F. Well at least we are having a beautiful day today. It's supposed to reach a high of 73º F. I had to remove the weather reporting app from the right column as it was no longer being supported.

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I was copied on an e-mail saying that RF Technology Pty Ltd, an Australian company, is taking over DX Radio Systems and will be supporting DX customers out of a California office. More in LETTERS TO THE EDITOR.

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I am sure we all share in the sadness of the friends and families of the people on the missing Malaysia Airlines Flight 370. I have been watching a lot of the television coverage. It is amazing to me, when tragic events like this take place, how the commentators talk when they run out of things to say. They get tired, start repeating themselves, start talking faster, and start making lots of mistakes. I guess that's understandable. One thing that irritated me though, was one of the “expert commentators” who was sitting in a 777 flight simulator, demonstrated how easy it was for anyone in the plane's cockpit to turn off the transponder. He reached over and turned a knob in the center console, and said, “There, now the plane is invisible!”

Anyone who has ever flown an airplane, or has even taken flight lessons, would know that a transponder only identifies the aircraft. It can't possibly turn off the ground radar or make the plane invisible.

“ . . . a flight transponder is a device that emits an identifying signal in response to an interrogating received signal.” [source]

“. . . the transponder sends back a transponder code (or "squawk code", Mode A) or altitude information (Mode C) to help air traffic controllers to identify the aircraft and to maintain separation between planes.” [source ]

“Radar (acronym for RAdio Detection And Ranging) is an object-detection system that uses radio waves to determine the range, altitude, direction, or speed of objects.” [ source ]

Flight controllers and technicians on the ground watching a radar display screen would still see a “blip” it just wouldn't identify itself as “Flight 370.” It would be anonymous.

Of course, this all refers to civilian aircraft. I am sure military aircraft have lots of secret ways to trick radar, including “friend or foe” and probably even “I am not here.”

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I received some responses from last week's appeal for newsletter support. This is the time of year when it is most urgently needed, so if you can help please do so.

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Now on to more news and views.

Wireless Messaging News
  • Emergency Radio Communications
  • Wireless Messaging
  • Critical Messaging
  • Telemetry
  • Paging
  • Wi-Fi
Wireless
wireless logo medium
Messaging

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About Us

A new issue of the Wireless Messaging Newsletter is posted on the web each week. A notification goes out by e-mail to subscribers on most Fridays around noon central US time. The notification message has a link to the actual newsletter on the web. That way it doesn't fill up your incoming e-mail account.

There is no charge for subscription and there are no membership restrictions. Readers are a very select group of wireless industry professionals, and include the senior managers of many of the world's major Paging and Wireless Messaging companies. There is an even mix of operations managers, marketing people, and engineers — so I try to include items of interest to all three groups. It's all about staying up-to-date with business trends and technology.

I regularly get readers' comments, so this newsletter has become a community forum for the Paging, and Wireless Messaging communities. You are welcome to contribute your ideas and opinions. Unless otherwise requested, all correspondence addressed to me is subject to publication in the newsletter and on my web site. I am very careful to protect the anonymity of those who request it.

I spend the whole week searching the Internet for news that I think may be of interest to you — so you won't have to. This newsletter is an aggregator — a service that aggregates news from other news sources. You can help our community by sharing any interesting news that you find.

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Editorial Policy

Editorial Opinion pieces present only the opinions of the author. They do not necessarily reflect the views of any of advertisers or supporters. This newsletter is independent of any trade association.

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Back To Paging

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Still The Most Reliable Protocol For Wireless Messaging!

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Subscriptions

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If you would like to subscribe to the newsletter just fill in the blanks in the form above, and then click on the “Subscribe” bar.

free There is no charge for subscription and there are no membership restrictions. It's all about staying up-to-date with business trends and technology.

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If you are reading this, your potential customers are probably reading it as well. Please click here to find out how.

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Can You Help The Newsletter?

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You can help support the Wireless Messaging News by clicking on the PayPal Donate button above. It is not necessary to be a member of PayPal to use this service.

Reader Support

Newspapers generally cost 75¢ $1.50 a copy and they hardly ever mention paging or wireless messaging. If you receive some benefit from this publication maybe you would like to help support it financially? A donation of $50.00 would certainly help cover a one-year paid subscription. If you are wiling and able, please click on the PayPal Donate button above.

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Advertiser Index

American Messaging
Critical Alert Systems
Critical Response Systems
Eagle Telecom
Easy Solutions
Hahntech USA
Hark Technologies
Ira Wiesenfeld & Associates
Ivycorp
Leavitt Communications
Preferred Wireless
Prism Paging
Product Support Services — (PSSI)
Paging & Wireless Network Planners LLC — (Ron Mercer)
WiPath Communications

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Interconnection Services, Inc.
Telecommunications Industry Consulting

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Paging Death Reports Greatly Exaggerated

Landline Phone Companies, Maybe Not.

By Vic Jackson

The facetious headline of this article is a take off of a saying attributed to Mark Twain. “The report of my death was an exaggeration.” (From a note Twain wrote in London on May 31, 1897 to reporter Frank Marshall White.) 1

It seems as though the phone companies haven't yet got the message that the widely reported death of paging is an exaggeration, or more accurately, totally wrong. To put it bluntly, the paging business is alive and well and thriving in the new paradigm of smart phones that can fail during times of crisis, government spy agencies gone amok, corporate spy agencies that collect data on their employees and customers, data brokers that sell our collective Internet souls, privacy of communications concerns that are a laughing matter, good old fashioned simplicity, and interoperability of communications for less than a zillion dollars. Yeah, I have probably left out some doozies that should be listed, but hopefully, you get the picture. Oh, and don't forget that those slick little pagers and the accompanying paging services are damn cheap too!

OK, so maybe my reporting on this subject is a little skewed. It seems the phone companies (The old land lines and Cellular) certainly wish paging was dead!

Paging companies that are thriving are not standing around waiting for customers to beat down their doors. They are out selling a modern array of services and products that integrate the advantages of commercial mobile radio paging into twenty-first century businesses and government services. Pager salesmen can have a portfolio that includes everything from cell phones, two-way radios, radio tower rental, Internet Service, integrated telephone services, video calling, voice mail, PBX services, healthcare telecommunications, and billboards, to name a few.

Although one would think that a modern paging system would suffice with a connection to the Internet, in fact, there is still a need for good old fashioned telephone numbers to access pagers. The integration of the Public Switched Telephone Network with modern telecommunications is an ongoing affair. The Federal Communications Commission has only recently decided that voice over Internet protocol should be the new standard for connections to the public telephone network. Virtually all of the landline companies are still mired in Time Domain Multiplexing for their trunk lines, a 1950's technology. Hence, the need for a paging company to interconnect with the national telephone network, normally via a local landline telephone company.

Interconnection of paging systems with the telephone companies has become somewhat of a conundrum since the Federal Communications Commission's Bill and Keep orders in late 2011. (For you wonks and nerds, those would be FCC 11-161 and FCC 11-189 ) Basically, the FCC's orders mandated that call termination fees between landline telephone companies and Commercial Mobile Radio Service providers (make that primarily Cellular and Paging) be eliminated. For the Cellular companies, Bill and Keep has been a bonanza. Kind of like having your house mortgage payments eliminated. But, you ask, why would a paging company, that only terminates call traffic, want an interconnection agreement that eliminates payments for terminating call traffic? The subtle answer is that the biggie in paging has been, for many paging carriers, the cost of the trunk lines connecting the local phone company to the paging system. Generally, the payments for paging termination calls have been minuscule, to say the least. Bizarre as it may seem, many of the land line phone companies have been charging paging carriers for receiving paging calls. And that practice continues today! Regardless of the rationale, twisted as it may be in some cases, these bogus trunk line charges can add up to some real money. However, the FCC's Bill and Keep order of November 18, 2011 makes clear that the phone companies deliver all call traffic they send to a paging carrier's point of interconnection, free of charge for any facilities involved. But therein lies the problem. Those old creaky phone companies are trying to live in the past.

The new paradigm of Bill and Keep call traffic for the landline phone companies is basically what the Internet has always done since it began a generation ago. Now that the telephone companies are responsible for delivering call traffic to the paging carriers physical location, they have great trouble figuring out how to provision and maintain what is now their own network. Previously, it was the paging carriers responsibility to “order” trunk facilities using the arcane forms and language of the telephone companies. Such terms as “Access Service Request” and a jillion acronyms and codes had to be mastered to order anything. When an agreement for the new connections is considered, the phone companies still insist on including insurance provisions and tariff references showing zero charges. As we get closer and closer to a dedicated national telecommunications network based on the Internet Protocol, the legacy world of the local telephone exchange carriers will gradually fade away. Technology will have overtaken another victim afflicted with lethargic business arthritis.

The bottom line is that radio paging may not be the fanciest or the sexiest technology, but unlike the old landline telephone companies, it has managed to morph into a new place in the twenty-first century world.

1 source

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2377 Seminole Dr. • Okemos MI  48864 • Telephone 517 381-0744
E-Mail  vic@interconnectionservices.com

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Ivy Corp Eagle Telecom

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ivy

eagle

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Critical Response Systems

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More than Paging.
First Responder Solutions.

Our patented technology notifies clinical personnel immediately, while tracking who receives and responds to each alarm. Users confirm or defer each event with a single button press, and analytic dashboards display response statistics in real time, as well as historically broken down by time, unit, room, and individual.

Our systems not only notify your personnel quickly and reliably, but also provide actionable feedback to fine-tune your procedures, reduce unnecessary alarms, and improve patient outcomes.

www.criticalresponsesystems.com

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Alarm Fatigue and Its Management Have Become

Serious Healthcare Safety Issues.

crs

The constant beeping of clinical alarms and an overabundance of information transmitted by medical devices such as ventilators, blood pressure monitors and ECG (electrocardiogram) machines, etc. are creating “alarm fatigue” that puts hospital patients at serious risk, according to an April 2013 Sentinel Event Alert issued by The Joint Commission (TJC).

The TJC Alert urges hospitals to take a focused look at this serious patient safety issue. Over a recent four-year period, a U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) database shows that there were more than 560 alarm-related deaths and TJC’s sentinel event database includes reports of 80 alarm-related deaths and 13 serious alarm-related injuries during a similar period. Click here for a free white paper that provides a cost-effective solution for managing alarm fatigue and mitigating its risks to patients.

Alarm fatigue can be overcome if hospitals employ the proper technology and training. You can actually learn from your clinical alarms. Critical Response Systems ResponseView™ Dashboard provides real time analytics on your alarm messaging. These analytics provide actionable results and information that you can use for training purposes to establish new procedures and processes to reduce unnecessary alarms.

One of Critical Response Systems’ major hospital clients recently received an award for their work on alarm fatigue.

The hospital uses the CRS critical alerting solution and the M1503 Pager to provides a dedicated system for enterprise-wide critical alerting that works to reduce alarm fatigue by combining excellent performance with reliability, helping to ensure that all critical alert alarms are handled properly.

Contact us today at 770-441-9559 or e-mail bclaise@criticalresponse.com

Copyright © 2014 Critical Response Systems, Inc.
Our address is 1670 Oakbrook Drive, Suite 370, Norcross, GA, 30093
Source: CRS

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Telephone: 918-814-8142
Tulsa, Oklahoma

This is a commercial message from Solavei, LLC

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In The USA

Text-to-911: Quick Facts & FAQs

  • Today most consumers cannot reach 911 by sending a text message from their wireless phone.
  • In limited areas of the United States , however, it is now possible to use certain wireless telephone services to send a text message to 911. This means that in such areas, if you are unable to make a voice 911 call, you can type your message on your wireless phone and send it to a 911 operator.  But even where text-to-911 is available, if you are able to make a voice call to 911, and if it is safe to do so, you should always make a voice call to 911 instead.
  • The four largest wireless telephone companies (AT&T, Sprint, T-Mobile, and Verizon) have voluntarily committed to make texting to 911 available by May 15, 2014 in areas where the local 911 center is prepared to receive the texts.
  • By September 30, 2013, if you attempt to send a text to 911 where text-to-911 service is unavailable, you will receive an immediate "bounce-back" message that text-to-911 is not available and that you should contact emergency services by another means, such as by making a voice call or using telecommunications relay services (the latter for consumers who are deaf, hard of hearing, or have a speech disability).
  • For more information and/or updates regarding text-to-911, please visit http://www.fcc.gov/text-to-911 . For links to FCC proceedings about text-to-911, please visit:  http://www.fcc.gov/document/text-911-bounce-back-message-order , and  http://www.fcc.gov/document/text-911-further-notice-proposed-rulemaking .

Frequently Asked Questions

What is text-to-911 and why would I want to use it?

It is the ability to send a "short message" (SMS) or other kind of text message to 911. Texting during an emergency could be helpful if you are deaf, hard of hearing, or have a speech disability, or if a voice call to 911 might otherwise be dangerous or impossible. But if you are able to make a voice call to 911, and if it is safe to do so, you should always make a voice call to 911.

How can I find out if my area has text-to-911 capability?

Ask your wireless phone company if text-to-911 is available in your area. You can also ask your state legislators or public safety officials if your local 911 center is prepared to accept text-to-911 messages. Public information lines, such as 211 or 311, also may have more information on text-to-911 service availability in your area. (Also,  see information on specific areas where Text-to-911 is available. )

If text-to-911 is available in my area, what type of wireless phone or service do I need to send an emergency text?

Check with your wireless phone company. In general, you must have a text-capable wireless phone and a wireless service subscription or contract with a wireless phone company. You may also need a "wireless data plan." Remember, you can make a voice call to 911 using a wireless phone that does not have a service plan, but you cannot send a text message to 911 without a service contract that includes texting.

Why isn't text-to-911 available everywhere in the country?

Text-to-911 is a new capability that may require upgrades to local 911 centers and coordination among wireless phone companies, equipment vendors and manufacturers, and state and local public safety agencies. It is likely to become more widely available over time as wireless phone companies provide text-to-911 capability and 911 centers modernize their systems to accept text messages.

If I am able to text-to-911, will the 911 center automatically know my location?

Texting to 911 is different from making a voice call to 911 in this respect. When you make a voice call to 911, the call taker will typically receive your phone number and your approximate location automatically. This is called "Enhanced 911" or "E911." However, in most cases when you text 911 from a wireless phone, the call taker will not receive this automated information. For this reason, if you send a text message to 911, it is important to give the 911 call taker an accurate address or location as quickly as possible, if you can.

If text-to-911 is available to me, why should I use it only when a voice call to 911 is not an option?

Voice calls to 911 are usually the most efficient way to reach emergency help. For example, voice calls allow the 911 operator to more quickly ask questions and obtain information from the caller, while two-way communication by text can take more time and is subject to limits on the length of text messages. In addition, when you make a voice call to 911, the call taker will typically receive your phone number and the approximate location of your phone automatically.

What are the FCC's rules on 911?

The FCC's 911 rules require the following:

  • Wireless phone companies must transmit all 911 voice calls to 911 centers (also known as Public Safety Answering Points, or PSAPs).
  • Wireless phone companies must send information about your telephone number and location to a PSAP when you make a 911 call so you can get help more easily.
  • Wireless phone companies, as well as certain text messaging applications, must provide, no later than September 30, 2013, automated "bounce-back" messages in instances when you attempt to send a text message to 911 in an area where text-to-911 service is unavailable. The bounce-back messages will inform you that text-to-911 is not available and direct you to contact emergency services by another means, such as by making a voice call or using telecommunications relay services (if you are deaf, hard of hearing, or have a speech disability).
  • The FCC does not currently require any companies to transmit text messages to 911 centers. However, the FCC currently is seeking public comment on proposed rules that would require wireless phone companies and certain other text message providers to begin transmitting text messages to 911 in the future.
  • The FCC does not have authority to issue rules regulating 911 centers, and so it cannot require these centers to accept text messages.
  • For More Information

    To learn more about FCC programs to promote access to

    telecommunications services for people with disabilities, visit the FCC's  Disability Rights Office website .

    For information about other telecommunications issues, visit the FCC’s  Consumer website , or contact the FCC’s Consumer Center by calling 1-888-CALL-FCC (1-888-225-5322) voice or 1-888-TELL-FCC (1-888-835-5322) TTY; faxing 1-866-418-0232; or writing to:

    Federal Communications Commission
    Consumer and Governmental Affairs Bureau
    Consumer Inquiries and Complaints Division
    445 12th Street, SW
    Washington, DC 20554

    Source: FCC

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    leavitt

    Specialists in sales and service of equipment from these leading manufacturers, as well as other two-way radio and paging products:

    UNICATIONbendix king
    ZETRON

    motorola blue Motorola SOLUTIONS

    COMmotorola red Motorola MOBILITY spacer
     usalert
    Philip C. Leavitt
    Manager
    Leavitt Communications
    7508 N. Red Ledge Drive
    Paradise Valley, AZ 85253
    CONTACT INFORMATION
    E-mail: pcleavitt@leavittcom.com
    Web Site: www.leavittcom.com
    Mobile phone:847-494-0000
    Telephone:847-955-0511
    Fax:270-447-1909
    Skype ID:pcleavitt

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    In Canada

    What You Need to Know about TEXT with 9-1-1

    What is Text with 9-1-1 (T9-1-1)?

    T9-1-1 is a service available to you if you are part of the deaf, deafened, hard of hearing or speech impaired (DHHSI) community in Canada.

    During an emergency, T9-1-1 provides 9-1-1 call centres with the ability to converse with you using text messaging.

    Before utilizing this service you:

    How It Works

    T9-1-1 provides 9-1-1 call centres with the ability to converse with a deaf, deafened, hard of hearing or speech impaired (DHHSI) person during an emergency, using text messaging.

    When a DHHSI person requires 9-1-1 services, they dial 9-1-1 on their cell phone. There is no need for them to speak, as the 9-1-1 call taker will receive an indicator that tells them to communicate with the caller via text messaging. The 9-1-1 call taker then initiates text messaging with the caller to address the emergency.

    A DHHSI person must register for T9-1-1 with their wireless service provider and must have an eligible cell phone before being able to utilize this service. This includes the ability to send and receive text messages.

    Information on cell phones that meet T9-1-1 requirements are available on your wireless service provider’s Web site. The sign-up process requires that the applicant has a qualified cell phone.

    T9-1-1 is considered a “best efforts” service due to the technology constraints associated with text messaging. As with any text messaging services, there is no guarantee a text message will be sent, delivered or received in a timely manner. In the unlikely event that this happens, the user will need to re-send the message.

    Providing location information and the nature of the emergency in the first message is imperative. The 9-1-1 call taker may receive an approximate location of your cell phone with your 9-1-1 call, however it is important for the caller to confirm the exact location of the emergency.

    Important Information for T9-1-1 Users

    • Text messages should be brief and concise.
    • Text abbreviations and slang should never be used so that the intent of the dialog can be as clear as possible.
    • If the DHHSI callers are outside or near the edge of the 9-1-1 served territory, the 9-1-1 call may not reach the appropriate 9-1-1 call centre.
    • Cell phones that meet T9-1-1 requirements will be listed on your wireless service provider’s Web site.
    • T9-1-1 should only be used for emergency situations that require a response from police, fire or emergency medical services.
    Source: Canadian Wireless Telecommunications Association

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    American Messaging

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    amsi

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    American Messaging

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    Easy Solutions

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    easy solutions

    Easy Solutions provides cost effective computer and wireless solutions at affordable prices. We can help in most any situation with your communications systems. We have many years of experience and a vast network of resources to support the industry, your system and an ever changing completive landscape.

    • We treat our customers like family. We don't just fix problems . . . We recommend and implement better cost effective solutions.
    • We are not just another vendor . . . We are a part of your team. All the advantages of high priced full time employment without the cost.
    • We are not in the Technical Services business . . . We are in the Customer Satisfaction business.

    Experts in Paging Infrastructure

    • Glenayre, Motorola, Unipage, etc.
    • Excellent Service Contracts
    • Full Service—Beyond Factory Support
    • Contracts for Glenayre and other Systems starting at $100
    • Making systems More Reliable and MORE PROFITABLE for over 30 years.

    Please see our web site for exciting solutions designed specifically for the Wireless Industry. We also maintain a diagnostic lab and provide important repair and replacement parts services for Motorola and Glenayre equipment. Call or e-mail us for more information.

    Easy Solutions
    3220 San Simeon Way
    Plano, Texas 75023

    Vaughan Bowden
    Telephone: 972-898-1119
    Website: www.EasySolutions4You.com
    E-mail: vaughan@easysolutions4you.com

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    Easy Solutions

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    Product Support Services, Inc.

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    Repair and Refurbishment Services

    pssi logo

    pssi

    Product Support Services, Inc.

    511 South Royal Lane
    Coppell, Texas 75019
    (972) 462-3970 Ext. 261
    sales@pssirl.com left arrow
    www.pssirl.com left arrow

    PSSI is the industry leader in reverse logistics, our services include depot repair, product returns management, RMA and RTV management, product audit, test, refurbishment, re-kitting and value recovery.

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    Classified Advertising

    Want to Buy

    For Sale

    Vocom 350 Watt UHF amplifiers
    Giles Smith gsmith@gcseac.com
    GCS Electronics & Communications
     
    QT-250 B high-band transmitter with an analogue exciter and instruction book. Don't really need the rack. Looking for something to run a couple hundred watts on the 2 meter ham band.
    John Parmalee
    Jparmalee@aol.com
    281-380-3811
     
    Hark Verifier or a Hark Verifier II and Icom IC PCR 100 receiver.
    Steve Suker
    CVC Paging
    Steve.Suker@cvc-aac.com
    802-775-6726
     
      
    If you have any equipment that you would like to buy or sell, please send me an e-mail and I will include it in the classified section above. If a sale is made I ask the seller to send me a 10% commission, much the same as the voluntary payments that are requested on the Internet for shareware. There is no cost to the buyer. This is on the honor system — no contracts — just the Internet equivalent of a hand shake.

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    Leavitt Communications

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    its stil here

    It's still here — the tried and true Motorola Alphamate 250. Now owned, supported, and available from Leavitt Communications. Call us for new or reconditioned units, parts, manuals, and repairs.

    We also offer refurbished Alphamate 250's, Alphamate IIs, the original Alphamate and new and refurbished pagers, pager repairs, pager parts and accessories. We are FULL SERVICE in Paging!

    E-mail Phil Leavitt (pcleavitt@leavittcom.com) for pricing and delivery information or for a list of other available paging and two-way related equipment.

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    Phil Leavitt
    847-955-0511
    pcleavitt@leavittcom.com

    leavitt logo

    7508 N. Red Ledge Drive
    Paradise Valley, AZ 85253
    www.leavittcom.com

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    Moto 360: The future of Android Wear is round

    CNET Editors' Take March 19, 2014 12:26 PM PDT c|net

    (Credit: Motorola)

    The landscape of smartwatches is changing fast, and most of that has to do with Google taking its next big step with Android Wear. Essentially Android for wearables, Android Wear aims to consolidate and unify smartwatches and other devices to work well with Google Now, and create a new wave of better products.

    The Moto 360 is Motorola's first Android Wear device, and one of only two flagship Android Wear products so far (the other is the LG G Watch , which we know far less about). So, what makes the Moto 360 so interesting? For the most part, it's the look.

    A big, round watch face screen, as opposed to the square type we're normally used to, makes the Moto 360 look like a regular fashion watch from a distance. But, in action, Google Now and other services transform the watch into a variety of at-a-glance uses.

    After a Google Hangout with lead designer Jim Wicks, more details emerged. Here's what we know so far.

    It's water-resistant. We don't know how much, or if it's as waterproof as the Pebble . Sounds like it won't be good for swimming.

    There's no charge port. Motorola teased that it doesn't use Micro-USB or have any contacts. Some other wireless technology? We won't find out more, probably, until Google I/O in June.

    It works with any Android 4.3 phone. Expect that to be true for Android Wear across the board, most likely.

    The round design is meant to appeal to both genders, and to be functional. Sure, Motorola created the Moto 360 to stand out, but according to Wicks, the round design fits more surface area without corners cutting into your wrist. Also, the intent is to make the Moto 360 appeal to as wide a range of people as possible, women and men.

    (Credit: Motorola)

    Yes, you'll be able to change bands. We know of steel and leather bands so far, but hints have been dropped about more detailed Moto Maker-like customization.

    This won't be the only round Android Wear watch. Android Wear has two standard screen shapes in its SDK: square, and round. Moto 360 adopts the round design that Google is already allowing for. That could mean other round watches, and soon.

    Southpaws can use it too. The design allows for left- or right-hand use, but we don't know how yet. It's safe to assume the screen will flip depending on orientation.

    (Credit: Motorola)

    There's no camera. According to Motorola, having a camera like the Samsung Gear 2 didn't mesh with the idea of the watch's contextual-information-gathering design.

    It's meant to be comforting and easy to use. Comfort came up as a frequent reference point: both to familiarity in design, and to a simple, at-a-glance type of function. A lot of that will be how Google Now pushes to and works with Android Wear watches, including the Moto 360. But there's only one button that we can see, plus a touch screen and microphone.

    You can talk to it. Google Now will allow for Moto X-style requests.

    You can always tell time with it. Funny, but true: Jim Wicks promises you'll always be able to lift your wrist and see the time. Actually, on many current smartwatches, depending on what app you're in, that's not always the case.

    Does it have fitness-tracking? That hasn't been mentioned yet. We certainly hope so, but there's a curious lack of emphasis on health-tracking thus far.

    What's battery life like? Motorola has been coy on an actual number, but claims that battery life has been "made a priority." Motorola claims it's learned from its previous experience with its first watch MotoActv, and also Moto X.

    When is it available? Summer, but no firm date has been announced. Expect more details at Google I/O in late June.

    How much does it cost? Again, we don't know.

    Source: c|net

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    Consulting Alliance

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    Brad Dye, Ron Mercer, Allan Angus, Vic Jackson, and Ira Wiesenfeld are friends and colleagues who work both together and independently, on wireline and wireless communications projects. Click here left arrow for a summary of their qualifications and experience. Each one has unique abilities. We would be happy to help you with a project, and maybe save you some time and money.

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    3Zetron 2200 Terminals
    1Unipage—Many Unipage Cards & Chassis
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    38Andrews PG1N0F-0093-810 Antennas 928-944 MHz, Omni, 10dBi, 8 Degree Down-Tilt
    4Andrews PG1D0F-0093-610 Antennas 928-944 MHz, Omni, 10dBi, 6 Degree Down Tilt
    Link Transmitters:
    1QT-5701, 35W, UHF, Link Transmitter
    4Glenayre QT4201 & 6201, 25 & 100W Midband Link TX
    1Glenayre QT6994, 150W, 900 MHz Link TX
    3Motorola 10W, 900 MHz Link TX (C35JZB6106)
    2Eagle 900 MHz Link Transmitters, 60 & 80W
    8Glenayre GL C2100 Link Repeaters
    2Motorola Q2630A, 30W, UHF Link TX
    VHF Paging Transmitters
    1Glenayre QT7505
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    25GLT8311
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    20Glenayre UHF GLT5340, 125W, DSP Exciter
    900 MHz Paging Transmitters:
    2Glenayre GLT8200, 25W
    15Glenayre GLT-8500 250W
    3Glenayre GLT 8600, 500W
    40Motorola Nucleus 900 MHz 300W CNET Transmitters

    SEE WEB FOR COMPLETE LIST:

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    Too Much To List • Call or E-Mail

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    Preferred Wireless, Inc.
    10658 St. Charles Rock Rd.
    St. Louis, MO 63074
    888-429-4171 or 314-429-3000
    rickm@preferredwireless.com left arrow

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    Preferred Wireless

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    critical alert CA Partner’s Program
     

    Providing better communications solutions to hospitals across the country — together!

    For CAS, strong partnerships remain key to providing our software-based communications solutions to our customers. These solutions include:

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    nurse call systemscritical messaging solutionsmobile health applications

    We provide the communication, training and resources required to become a CA partner. In turn, our partners provide customers with the highest levels of local service & support. CA Partners may come from any number of business sectors, including:

    • Service Providers
    • System Integrators
    • Value Added Resellers and Distributors
    • Expert Contractors
    If you would like to hear more about our CA Partners program, we’d love to hear from you. criticalalert.com

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    Selected portions of the BloostonLaw Telecom Update, and/or the BloostonLaw Private Users Update — newsletters from the Law Offices of Blooston, Mordkofsky, Dickens, Duffy & Prendergast, LLP are reproduced in this section with the firm's permission.

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    BloostonLaw Telecom Update Vol. 17, No. 11 March 19, 2014

    Accessibility Report due April 1; Small Businesses No Longer Exempt

    Entities providing traditional telecommunications services, interconnected VoIP, advanced communications services (ACS) (which includes non-interconnected VoIP, electronic messaging services, paging, interoperable video conferencing) and mobile web browsers must submit recordkeeping compliance certifications and contact information to the FCC annually by April 1, 2014, in connection with accessibility requirements imposed by the Twenty-First Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act of 2010 (CVAA). Important to note this year that the exemption for certain small businesses is no longer in effect, so many entities that did not have to file last year will have to do so this year. Resellers are subject to the reporting obligation as well. New this year, providers of non-interconnected VoIP services, email, text messaging, instant messaging, two-way interactive messaging services on social networking websites, and interoperable video conferencing services must make the same certification regarding their accessibility recordkeeping (however, only for the period from October 9 to December 31, 2013, after the former small entity exemption terminated).

    BloostonLaw has worked up a template for the reporting obligation, and can assist our clients with the filing process.

    Headlines

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    FCC Announces Workshop on Technology Transitions And Public Safety

    The Federal Communications Commission’s Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau announced a workshop on “Public Safety Imperatives for All-IP Networks.” The 1½ day workshop will be held on Thursday, April 17, 2014, and Friday, April 18, 2014.

    ILEC Associations Seek Extension of 2014 Local Service Rate Floor Deadline

    All six of the national and regional associations representing small and mid-sized rural telephone companies (ERTA, ITTA, NECA, NTCA, USTelecom and WTA) filed a Petition on March 11, 2014, asking the Wireline Competition Bureau to extend the deadline for compliance with the new (and, as yet, unannounced) 2014 local service rate floor from July 1, 2014 to January 2, 2015. They also asked that subsequent adjustments to the local rate floor, as needed, be made annually on January 2 and that mid-year corrections be permitted until July 1 of each succeeding year.

    The association action was precipitated by reliable rumors that the FCC’s urban rate survey had indicated that the Rule 54.318 local urban rate floor should be more than $20.50. As clients are aware, the current local urban rate floor [defined as: the carrier’s flat rate for residential local service, plus state regulated fees (state subscriber line charges, state universal service fees, and mandatory extended area service charges)] is $14. As clients are also aware, federal high-cost support is reduced, on a dollar-for-dollar basis, by the amount by which a carrier’s local rate falls below this local urban rate floor.

    Reliable rumors also indicated that the Wireline Bureau’s initial inclination was to increase the local urban rate floor to approximately $17.25 for the July 1, 2014 certification, and then to approximately $20.50 for the July 1, 2015 certification. Unfortunately, even an increase from $14 to the $17.25 area poses a major problem for many local exchange carriers in obtaining requisite state commission approvals and providing required advance notice to customers. In some states, these problems are virtually insurmountable, given that the FCC has not formally set the new local urban rate floor as of mid-March.

    Even where time allows, increases in local rates to the levels necessary to get to the prospective local urban rate floors, plus the scheduled annual increases in the federal Access Recovery Charge (“ARC”) have not historically proven to be effective ways of decreasing line loss trends or increasing broadband adoption.

    Although the Bureau has not yet issued the local urban rate floor for the July 1, 2014 certification, it is not yet clear whether the initial Association response has convinced the Wireline Bureau to change or modify its course, We will keep you apprised of developments as they occur.

    AT&T Details Proposal for Waiver of Call Completion Data Collection Requirements

    AT&T has filed a letter with the FCC (WC Docket No. 13-39) providing further details of its request for a waiver of certain rural call completion data collection and retention requirements. According to AT&T, it is not able to fully comply with the FCC's rules because it does not make a record for all call attempts and some of its services make records only for answered calls and it would be too burdensome to modify legacy systems. Because of these issues, AT&T proposes to track call completion levels based on a sample of traffic. AT&T states that the sample will be based on originating Access Charge Verification (O-ACV) Records from the AT&T long distance network. According to AT&T, these records are made for a random sample of switched access call attempts from non AT&T LECs. AT&T states that O-ACV are not made for Mobility and AT&T LEC calls, among other. However, AT&T maintains that its daily sampling of O-ACV records is large enough to detect any differences in call completion rates between rural and non-rural OCNs.

    In its filing, AT&T also states that some mobility traffic uses intermediate providers, but not to rural OCNs and that it will not alter this policy unless and until reporting can be provided for this traffic. AT&T states that only one small long distance affiliate uses an intermediate provider in one limited circumstance.

    Senator Johnson Introduces Bill to Require Call Quality Standards and Address Rural Call Completion Problems

    Senator Tim Johnson (D-SD) has introduced the Public Safety and Economic Security Communications Act to address call completion problems affecting rural communities. The Act would require the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to establish basic quality standards for voice calls and it would require providers that transport voice calls to register with the FCC and comply with those standards. The quality standards are intended to prevent the discriminatory delivery of calls to rural communities.

    Law & Regulation

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    Proposed USF Contribution Factor for Second Quarter 2014 is 16.6 Percent

    The FCC’s Office of Managing Director released a Public Notice on March 12, 2014, announcing the proposed USF contribution factor for Second Quarter 2014 as 16.6 percent, up from 16.4 percent in the previous quarter.

    House Approves FCC Process Reform Act

    By a voice vote on March 11, 2014, the House of Representatives approved the FCC Process Reform Act (H.R. 3675). This legislation aims to increase the transparency, predictability and accountability of the FCC, and, among other things, requires the FCC to seek comment and adopt rules that: set minimum comment periods for rulemaking proceedings, allow time for public comment by eliminating the practice of placing large amounts of data into the record on the last day of the public comment period, increase transparency regarding items before the Commissioners, require publication of the text of proposed rules, and set timelines for FCC action on certain types of proceedings. The bill now goes to the Senate for consideration. The bill has bipartisan support and will likely be enacted in the Senate.

    Specifically. The bill (if enacted) would require the FCC to adopt rules establishing:

    • minimum comment and reply periods for rulemakings;
    • policies to ensure that the public has notice and an opportunity to respond to comments, ex parte communications, or materials submitted toward the end of, or after, the comment period;
    • procedures for publishing the status of open rulemakings and items circulated for the Commissioners' review;
    • deadlines for public notice, and guidelines for disposition, of certain petitions; and
    • procedures to include the specific language of proposed rules or amendments in proposed rulemaking notices.

    The bill would also require performance measures to be included in notices of proposed rulemakings or orders that would create or substantially change a program activity. It defines "program activity" as a specific activity or project as listed in the program and financing schedules of the U.S. annual budget, including any annual collection or distribution or related series of collections or distributions by the FCC of $100 million or more.

    The bill directs the FCC to seek public comment regarding whether the FCC should: (1) establish procedures for allowing a bipartisan majority of Commissioners to place items on an open meeting agenda and for publishing in advance of such meetings the text of agenda items on which the FCC will vote; (2) establish deadlines for the disposition of certain license applications; and (3) publish orders, decisions, reports, and actions within 30 days after adoption.

    • It requires the FCC to initiate a new rulemaking proceeding every five years to continue its consideration of procedural rule changes.
    • It allows a bipartisan majority of Commissioners to hold a nonpublic meeting, including a meeting to collaborate with joint boards or conferences, if: (1) no votes or actions are taken, and (2) an attorney from the FCC's Office of General Counsel is present. It requires such a closed meeting to be disclosed within two business days after the meeting, along with a list of persons in attendance and a summary of discussed matters, provided that such matters are not classified or otherwise exempt from disclosure.
    • It directs the FCC to provide on its website: (1) information regarding the FCC's budget, appropriations, and total number of full-time equivalent employees; (2) the FCC's annual performance plan; and (3) information about consumer complaints in a publicly available, searchable database.
    • It directs the FCC to complete actions necessary for the required publication of documents in the Federal Register within specified time frames.
    • It requires the FCC to inform the public about its performance and efficiency in meeting disclosure and other requirements under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA), including by: (1) publishing on the FCC website its logs for managing FOIA requests and associated fees, (2) releasing decisions to grant or deny requests, and (3) presenting information about the number of FOIA requests received and granted or denied by the FCC in its annual budget estimates and annual performance and financial reports.
    • It directs the FCC, by January 15th of each year, to publish on its website and in other required formats an anticipated release schedule for all statistical reports and reports to Congress.
    • It requires annual reports to Congress on the FCC's performance in conducting its proceedings and meeting the deadlines and guidelines established by the Process Reform Act.
    • It prohibits the FCC, in compiling its quarterly report with respect to informal consumer inquiries and complaints, from categorizing an inquiry or complaint under the Telephone Consumer Protection Act of 1991 (which places restrictions on telephone solicitations and automatic dialing systems) as a wireline or wireless inquiry or complaint, unless a wireline or wireless carrier was the subject of the inquiry or complaint.
    • It exempts permanently from the Antideficiency Act (which prohibits expenditures or obligations of federal funds exceeding an amount available in an appropriation or fund) the collection of Universal Service Fund contributions and the use of such contributions for universal service support programs. Currently, universal service funds are collected and distributed under a temporary waiver provided in the Universal Service Antideficiency Temporary Suspension Act.

    FCC Commissioner Ajit Pai issued a statement praising the House Energy and Commerce Committee’s Subcommittee on Communications and Technology for its efforts. He described the bill as a “common-sense bill” and as “straightforward, good-government legislation.”

    Senators Ask FCC to Implement Remote Areas Fund

    Senators Kelly Ayotte (R-N.H.) and Roy Blunt (R-Mo.) sent a letter to Chairman Wheeler on March 13, 2014, asking the FCC to implement the “Remote Areas Fund” that was created by the 2011 CAF/ICC Order, and to provide them with an update on how the FCC plans to implement the RAF this year. They said a continued delay in RAF support roll-out could mean that important broadband services are being denied to those who need it most. The RAF is supposed to make “at least $100 million” available for reaching subscribers in “the most remote areas in the nation”. The FCC accepted public comments on implementation of the RAF more than a year ago, and had originally indicated that “We expect to finalize the Remote Areas Fund in 2012 with implementation in 2013”; but the Commission has been focused on implementation of the Mobility Fund mechanism first.

    Senator Rockefeller Issues Subpoena in Wireless Telephone Cramming Investigation

    John D. (Jay) Rockefeller (D – WV), chairman of the Senate Commerce Committee, on March 13, issued a subpoena to Mobile Messenger, a telephone “billing aggregator,” that has reportedly failed to provide complete information to the Committee related to wireless “cramming,” a practice whereby unauthorized third-party charges are placed on consumers’ wireless bills. Rockefeller initially wrote Mobile Messenger in March 2013 and again in November 2013, but noted in a new letter that “major gaps” remain in the company’s responses. This action continues the Committee’s investigation into how consumers have been affected by wireless cramming, and whether the wireless industry’s voluntary procedures and practices adequately protect consumers from this practice.

    “I am deeply disappointed that, nearly one full year after my initial request, Mobile Messenger has failed to produce key responsive information,” said Rockefeller. “It is also troubling that the company for many months has refused to provide information the Committee requested concerning the cramming scheme alleged by the Texas Attorney General in a November 2013 action against the company.”

    Mobile Messenger is one of several major billing aggregators that act as middlemen between wireless carriers and the third-party companies that place charges on consumers’ wireless bills. Carriers have relied on their assistance in verifying that consumers have authorized the purchase of third-party services for which the consumers are charged. The subpoena demands information including the identities of Mobile Messengers’ third-party vendors and the amounts they have charged consumers. Also demanded is information relating to consumer complaints received by the company and unredacted copies of contracts with carriers. Finally, the subpoena demands communications relating to the cramming scheme alleged in the Texas Attorney General’s action.

    U.S. Announces Intent to Transition Key Internet Domain Name Functions

    The U.S. Commerce Department’s National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) announced last Friday that it planned to relinquish control over the administration of the Internet to the global multi-stakeholder community. As the first step, NTIA is asking the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) to convene a meeting of global stakeholders to develop a proposal to transition the current role played by NTIA in the coordination of the Internet’s domain name system (DNS).

    U.S. Announces Intent to Transition Key Internet Domain Name Functions

    The U.S. Commerce Department’s National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) announced last Friday that it planned to relinquish control over the administration of the Internet to the global multi-stakeholder community. As the first step, NTIA is asking the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) to convene a meeting of global stakeholders to develop a proposal to transition the current role played by NTIA in the coordination of the Internet’s domain name system (DNS).

    NTIA currently contracts with ICANN to carry out the Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA) functions and has a Cooperative Agreement with Verisign under which it performs related root zone management functions. Transitioning NTIA out of its role marks the final phase of the privatization of the DNS as outlined by the U.S. Government in 1997.

    “The timing is right to start the transition process,” said Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Communications and Information Lawrence E. Strickling. “We look forward to ICANN convening stakeholders across the global Internet community to craft an appropriate transition plan.”

    A report from the Washington Post suggested that pressure had been mounting over the past decade for the U.S. to end its authority over the system of Web addresses, and that these efforts picked up steam recently due to controversy over global surveillance activities by the National Security Agency.

    Open internet advocates predictably applauded the announcement, while skeptics used the opportunity to criticize the Obama administration.

    “What is the global internet community that Obama wants to turn the internet over to?” wrote former House speaker Newt Gingrich via Twitter. “This risks foreign dictatorships defining the internet.”

    An international meeting to discuss the future of Internet is reportedly scheduled to start on March 23 in Singapore.

    Industry

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    Mexico Telecoms Reform Could Take Years To Unseat Slim

    Reuters is reporting that Carlos Slim's America Movil, which controls 70 percent of the Mexican mobile market and 80 percent of its fixed lines, was singled out for tougher measures last week by the Mexican Federal Telecommunications Institute (IFT), the new market regulator.

    His Mexico phone units must now present plans to lower rates for rivals using America Movil's mobile network, eliminate roaming charges, open up the fixed-line network and share transmission towers, ducts and other non-electronic infrastructure.

    Calendar At-A-Glance

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    March

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    Mar. 19 – Rural Broadband Workshop.
    Mar. 31
    – FCC Form 525 (Delayed Phase-down CETC Line Counts) is due.
    Mar. 31 – FCC Form 508 (ICLS Projected Annual Common Line Requirement) is due.
    Mar. 31 – Comments on FCC Process Reform Report are due.
    Mar. 31 – Comments are due on Rural Broadband Experiments and Numbering Research.
    Mar. 31 – Comments are due on AT&T Wire Center Trials Proposal.

    April

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    Apr. 1 – FCC Form 499-A (Telecommunications Reporting Worksheet) is due.
    Apr. 1 – Annual Accessibility Certification is due.
    Apr. 1 – PRA comments on Form 477 (Local Telephone Competition and Broadband Reporting) are due.
    Apr. 1 – PRA comments on Form 477 (Local Telephone Competition and Broadband Reporting) are due.
    Apr. 7 – Comments on E-Rate modernization are due.
    Apr. 10 – Reply comments are due on AT&T Wire Center Trials Proposal.
    Apr. 14 – Reply comments are due on Rural Broadband Experiments and Numbering Research.
    Apr. 21 – Reply comments on E-Rate modernization are due.

    This newsletter is not intended to provide legal advice. Those interested in more information should contact the firm. For additional information, please contact Hal Mordkofsky at 202-828-5520 or halmor@bloostonlaw.com .

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    Google Releases Android Wear Preview to Developers

    Tue, 03/18/2014 - 1:27pm
    Andrew Berg
    Wireless WEEK

    Google Tuesday announced the launch of a new Android-based developer platform specifically geared towards the creation of apps for wearable connected device.

    According a blog post by Sundar Pichai, senior vice president of Android, Chrome and apps for Google, the platform is called Android Wear and takes the wristwatch form factor as its starting point.

    Specifically, Android Wear aims to create a voice-controlled system for wearables that can bring users relevant information and also control other connected devices.

    "Android Wear lets you access and control other devices from your wrist," Pichai wrote in the blog. "Just say 'Ok Google' to fire up a music playlist on your phone, or cast your favorite movie to your TV."

    Developers can download a preview of the SDK so they can tailor existing app notifications for watches powered by Android Wear. Google said that some apps will already work well with the system.

    Google said it's working with several consumer electronics manufacturers, including Asus, HTC, LG, Motorola and Samsung; chip makers Broadcom, Imagination, Intel, Mediatek and Qualcomm; and fashion brands like the Fossil Group to bring to market watches powered by Android Wear later this year.

    Have a look at Google's vision for the platform in the video below:

    Source: Wireless WEEK

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    Friends & Colleagues

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    Ira Wiesenfeld, P.E.

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    Complete Technical Services For The Communications and Electronics Industries Design • Installation • Maintenance • Training • Engineering • Licensing • Technical Assistance

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    Ira Wiesenfeld, P.E.
    Consulting Engineer
    Registered Professional Engineer

    Tel/Fax: 972-960-9336
    Cell: 214-707-7711
    Web: IWA-RADIO.com
    7711 Scotia Dr.
    Dallas, TX 75248-3112
    E-mail: iwiesenfel@aol.com

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    Ira Wiesenfeld, P.E.

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    subscribe free

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    Wireless Network Planners

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    Wireless Specialists

    www.wirelessplanners.com
    wirelessplannerron@gmail.com

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    Consultant
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    Telephone: 631-266-2604
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    Wireless Network Planners

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    Prism Paging

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    PRISM IP MESSAGE GATEWAY

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    THE ULTIMATE IN COMMERCIAL AND PRIVATE RADIO PAGING SYSTEMS

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    • VoIP telephone access — eliminate interconnect expense
    • Call from anywhere — Prism SIP Gateway allows calls from PSTN and PBX
    • All the Features for Paging, Voice-mail, Text-to-Pager, Wireless and DECT phones
    • Prism Inet, the new IP interface for TAP, TNPP, SNPP, SMTP — Industry standard message input
    • Direct Connect to NurseCall, Assisted Living, Aged Care, Remote Monitoring, Access Control Systems
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    Regulatory: ARRL to FCC: "Grow Light" Ballast Causes HF Interference, Violates Rules

    03/14/2014

    The ARRL has formally complained to the FCC that a "grow light" ballast being widely marketed and sold is responsible for severe interference to the MF and HF bands. The League urged Commission action to halt sales of the Lumatek LK-1000 electronic ballast and to recall devices already on store shelves or in the hands of consumers. In a March 12 letter, ARRL General Counsel Chris Imlay, W3KD, told the FCC Enforcement Bureau and its Office of Engineering and Technology (OET) that, during ARRL Laboratory testing, the Lumatek device exhibited conducted emissions that exceeded FCC rules.


    The Lumatek LK-1000 electronic ballast.

    "ARRL has received numerous complaints from Amateur Radio operators of significant noise in the medium and high frequency bands between 1.8 MHz and 30 MHz from 'grow lights' and other RF lighting devices generally," Imlay said in the complaint. "The level of conducted emissions from this device is so high that, as a practical matter, one RF ballast operated in a residential environment would create preclusive interference to Amateur Radio HF communications throughout entire neighborhoods." An extensive Conducted Emissions Test Report detailing the ARRL Lab's test results was attached to the League's correspondence.

    "[T]he Report concludes from the conducted emissions tests that the six highest emissions from the device in the HF band vastly exceed the quasi-peak limit specified in Section 18.307(c) of the Rules," Imlay told the FCC. The ARRL further pointed out that, while an FCC sticker had been affixed to the device, it lacked FCC compliance information. FCC Part 18 rules require RF lighting devices to provide an advisory statement with such a device, notifying users that it could interfere with radio equipment operating between 0.45 MHz and 30 MHz.

    The League noted that the device is imported into the US and marketed and sold by Sears, where ARRL purchased its test sample, as well as by Amazon.com and other retail outlets. The ARRL also called on the FCC to consider enforcement proceedings against the importer, Hydrofarm Horticultural Products of Petaluma, California. Read more .

    Source: ARRL

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    WiPath Communications

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    Intelligent Solutions for Paging & Wireless Data

    WiPath manufactures a wide range of highly unique and innovative hardware and software solutions in paging and mobile data for:

    • Emergency Mass Alert & Messaging
    • Emergency Services Communications
    • Utilities Job Management
    • Telemetry and Remote Switching
    • Fire House Automation
    • Load Shedding and Electrical Services Control

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    PDT3000 Paging Data Terminal

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    • FLEX & POCSAG
    • Built-in POCSAG encoder
    • Huge capcode capacity
    • Parallel, 2 serial ports, 4 relays
    • Message & system monitoring

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    Paging Controlled Moving Message LED Displays

    welcom wipath

    • Variety of sizes
    • Indoor/outdoor
    • Integrated paging receiver

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    PDR3000/PSR3000 Paging Data Receivers

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    • Highly programmable, off-air decoders
    • Message Logging & remote control
    • Multiple I/O combinations and capabilities
    • Network monitoring and alarm reporting

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    Specialized Paging Solutions

    paging data receiver

    • Emergency Mass Alerting
    • Remote telemetry switching & control
    • Fire station automation
    • PC interfacing and message management
    • Paging software and customized solutions
    • Message interception, filtering, redirection, printing & logging Cross band repeating, paging coverage infill, store and forward
    • Alarm interfaces, satellite linking, IP transmitters, on-site systems

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    Mobile Data Terminals & Two Way Wireless  Solutions

    mobile data terminal

    radio interface

    • Fleet tracking, messaging, job processing, and field service management
    • Automatic vehicle location (AVL), GPS
    • CDMA, GPRS, ReFLEX, conventional, and trunked radio interfaces

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    Contact
    Postal
    Address:
    WiPath Communications LLC
    4845 Dumbbarton Court
    Cumming, GA 30040
    Street
    Address:
    4845 Dumbbarton Court
    Cumming, GA 30040
    Web site: www.wipath.com left arrow CLICK
    E-mail: info@wipath.com left arrow CLICK
    Phone:770-844-6218
    Fax:770-844-6574
    WiPath Communications

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    Hark Technologies

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    Wireless Communication Solutions

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    USB Paging Encoder

    paging encoder

    • Single channel up to eight zones
    • Connects to Linux computer via USB
    • Programmable timeouts and batch sizes
    • Supports 2-tone, 5/6-tone, POCSAG 512/1200/2400, GOLAY
    • Supports Tone Only, Voice, Numeric, and Alphanumeric
    • PURC or direct connect
    • Pictured version mounts in 5.25" drive bay
    • Other mounting options available
    • Available as a daughter board for our embedded Internet Paging Terminal (IPT)

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    Paging Data Receiver (PDR)

    pdr

    • Frequency agile—only one receiver to stock
    • USB or RS-232 interface
    • Two contact closures
    • End-user programmable w/o requiring special hardware
    • 16 capcodes
    • POCSAG
    • Eight contact closure version also available
    • Product customization available

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    Other products

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    Please see our web site for other products including Internet Messaging Gateways, Unified Messaging Servers, test equipment, and Paging Terminals.

    Contact
    Hark Technologies
    717 Old Trolley Rd Ste 6 #163
    Summerville, SC 29485
    Tel: 843-821-6888
    Fax: 843-821-6894
    E-mail: sales@harktech.com left arrow CLICK
    Web: http://www.harktech.com left arrow CLICK

    hark David George and Bill Noyes
    of Hark Technologies.

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    Click on the logo above for more info.

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    LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

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    From:John Parmalee
    Subject: D-Wave Computing
    Date:March 16, 2014 9:17:17 PM CDT
    To:Brad Dye

    Brad, I read with interest your D-Wave computing and forwarded it to three PhDs I know and a lady that programs a Super Computer for a major med school, here is one comment.

    It MAY provide some significant boosts in high-end compute power, which could yield other positive effects with respect to weather, health, energy, etc.

    I think I may send a copy to our local wx man.  I think thought this is beyond most folks that are vision bound by what we have.

    A thought of mine. It was the mid 80s that I got my first PC in the office, it was on my admin's desk, she was pretty good with it and I devised all kinds of things for her to do with it.  IBM had down scaled the main frame.

    Now I see this D-wave consists of two parts, chips that run cooled by liquid nitrogen and a new kind of process using positional calculation like an abacuses does.

    OK I don't expect to see a liquid cooled anything on my desk but what kind of speeds could come from room temperature, positional computing?

    BTW what ever happened to that liquid nitrogen cooled mega-watt generator, any in service you know of?

    DE: K5VGM

    John Parmalee
    Jparmalee@aol.com

    281-380-3811

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    From:Beck, Thomas James thomas.beck@nasa.gov
    Subject: FW: Follow-up
    Date:March 20, 2014 4:18:48 PM CDT
    Cc:Ira Wiesenfeld Iwiesenfel@aol.com
    To:Brad Dye

    I just spoke to Frank, He says he taking over DX Radio, should be completed in about 2 weeks, FYI.

    Thanks,

    Tom
    Electronic Comm. and RF Systems Grp.
    X 5556

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    From:Frank Romain frank.romanin@me.com
    Subject: RE: Follow-up
    Date:Tuesday, March 18, 2014 12:10 AM
    Cc:Brian Purcell sales@rftechnology.com.au
    To:Beck, Thomas James (WSTF-4321)[Jacobs Technology Inc

    Hi Thomas,

    I am not sure I got it. We will support all our equipment in the USA and have an office being set up in Costa Mesa we have a subsidiary IPMobilenet LLC in Santa Ana and are moving both offices to Costa Mesa.

    Please let me know your requirements and I will ensure they are met.

    I will be in the USA on Thursday please call me on the USA number to connect.

    Cheers,

    Frank

    Frank Romanin CEO

    RF Technology Pty Ltd
    Unit 46, 7 Sefton Road
    Thornleigh, NSW 2120 Australia
    www.rftechnology.com.au
    info@rftechnology.com.au
    ABN 14 131 764 148
    T: +61 2 9484 1022 ext 101
    F: + 61 2 9484 1822
    Aust. mobile: +61 409 350 760
    USA Cell: +1 714 856 8183

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