newsletter logo

Wireless News Aggregation

Friday — August 28, 2015 — Issue No. 672


Dear Friends of Wireless Messaging,

Welcome to The Wireless Messaging News.

Please don't miss the PHOTO OF THE WEEK at the end of this issue. It is about my latest radio project that I promised to keep everyone updated about. The nice thing about retirement is that every week has six Saturdays and one Sunday. I love editing this newsletter, and I also love having time to pursue hobbies, and other interests.


Did you help someone out last week as I suggested? If you did, don't tell me. That might be bragging, and so it wouldn't count. It's all about helping someone, in need, who doesn't expect it, and who doesn't have to pay you back. Some people call it “paying forward” like when you go through a drive-through getting coffee or a sandwich, and you pay for the person in the car behind you that you don't know. It makes the world a better place. Try it sometime.


Checkout Preferred Wireless' updated list of equipment. They have a big warehouse full of Paging Equipment. If you need something, I recommend that you give them a call.


NEW COMPUTER FOR THE NEWSLETTER

It's Time To Help

squeak

SQUEAK—SQUEAK—SQUEAK

They say, “a squeaking wheel gets the grease.”

Adobe has updated their Creative Cloud (Internet authoring) applications so I needed to replace one of my computers with a Mac Mini in order to run the new programs. If you would like to help sponsor this purchase, please click on the Donate button below.

paypal
left arrow

This newsletter is made possible by donations from readers, and advertising from vendors.

DONATION LOG

NEWSLETTER REQUIREMENTS AMOUNT BALANCE
Mac Mini Computer (charged) -$494.05 $494.05
Ira Wiesenfeld & Assoc. (donation given) +$200.00 $294.05
Backup memory (charged) -$42.77 $336.82
Monitor (charged) -$254.99 $591.81
Advantage Communications (donation given) +100.00 $491.81


Now on to news and views.

 

The Weather in Wayne County‚ Illinois

Find more about Weather in Fairfield, IL
Click for weather forecast


Wireless Messaging News
  • Emergency Radio Communications
  • Wireless Messaging
  • Critical Messaging
  • Telemetry
  • Paging
  • Wi-Fi
Wireless
wireless logo medium
Messaging

About Us

A new issue of the Wireless Messaging Newsletter is posted on the web each week. A notification goes out by e-mail to subscribers on most Fridays around noon central US time. The notification message has a link to the actual newsletter on the web. That way it doesn’t fill up your incoming e-mail account.

There is no charge for subscription and there are no membership restrictions. Readers are a very select group of wireless industry professionals, and include the senior managers of many of the world’s major Paging and Wireless Messaging companies. There is an even mix of operations managers, marketing people, and engineers — so I try to include items of interest to all three groups. It’s all about staying up-to-date with business trends and technology.

I regularly get readers’ comments, so this newsletter has become a community forum for the Paging, and Wireless Messaging communities. You are welcome to contribute your ideas and opinions. Unless otherwise requested, all correspondence addressed to me is subject to publication in the newsletter and on my web site. I am very careful to protect the anonymity of those who request it.

I spend the whole week searching the Internet for news that I think may be of interest to you — so you won’t have to. This newsletter is an aggregator — a service that aggregates news from other news sources. You can help our community by sharing any interesting news that you find.


Editorial Policy

Editorial Opinion pieces present only the opinions of the author. They do not necessarily reflect the views of any of advertisers or supporters. This newsletter is independent of any trade association.


Back To Paging

pagerman

Still The Most Reliable Protocol For Wireless Messaging!


Subscribe

It's Free!

* required field

If you would like to subscribe to the newsletter just fill in the blanks in the form above, and then click on the “Subscribe” button.

There is no charge for subscription and there are no membership restrictions. It’s all about staying up-to-date with business trends and technology.


twitter


facebook


CAN YOU HELP?

Can You Help The Newsletter?

paypal
left arrow

You can help support The Wireless Messaging News by clicking on the PayPal Donate button above. It is not necessary to be a member of PayPal to use this service.


Reader Support

Newspapers generally cost 75¢ $1.50 a copy and they hardly ever mention paging or wireless messaging, unless in a negative way. If you receive some benefit from this publication maybe you would like to help support it financially?

A donation of $50.00 would certainly help cover a one-year period. If you are wiling and able, please click on the PayPal Donate button above.


Newsletter Advertising

look

If you are reading this, your potential customers are reading it as well. Please click here to find out about our advertising options.



Advertiser Index

American Messaging  
Critical Alert  
Critical Response Systems  
Easy Solutions  
Falcon Wireless Direct  
Hark Technologies  
Ira Wiesenfeld & Associates  
Ivycorp  
Leavitt Communications  
Preferred Wireless  
Prism Paging  
Product Support Services — (PSSI) 
Paging & Wireless Network Planners LLC — (Ron Mercer) 
STI Engineering  
UltraTek Security Cameras  
WaveWare Technologies

How to cure Windows 10's worst headaches

These tips and tricks can help you overcome Windows 10's niggling hassles.

By: Ian PaulIan Paul | @ianpaul
Contributor, PCWorld
Aug 26, 2015 3:30 AM

After the Windows 8 disaster, upgrading to Windows 10 is almost palpably refreshing. Microsoft’s new operating system brings back PC-focused features it should never have lost and adds some helpful new integrations with Microsoft services.

It’s not perfect, though.

Despite the many highlights of Windows 10 — Cortana, virtual desktops, windowed Windows Store apps, the revamped Start menu, DirectX 12, among others — there are still some annoyances with the new operating system.

Windows 10 can reset your default browser if you upgrade; updates are now mandatory; and behind the scenes, the new OS is a file-sharing machine. Those are just a few of Windows 10’s notable headaches, but the good news is there are fixes for all these problems. Even better? Most are really easy to implement.

Let’s dig in.

Tame Windows 10’s forced updates

Windows 10 home users are now pretty much required to accept and install updates at the time and choosing of Microsoft. This can be disastrous if you get a bad update that bricks your system or puts it in an endless reboot cycle, or if you have to download updates on a metered connection.

Luckily, there are solutions for both.

For the latter, all you have to do is set your Wi-Fi connection to metered—though note that Microsoft does not allow you to set ethernet connections as metered. To set your Wi-Fi as metered, go to Settings > Network & Internet >Wi-Fi > Advanced options > Set as metered connection . Once your connection is set as metered, Windows 10 will allow you to download updates at the time of your choosing.

Check out our tutorial for setting Wi-Fi connections as metered in Windows 10 for a detailed breakdown of how to best take advantage of the feature.

To deal with bad updates, a little preparation goes a long way. During the preview phase of Windows 10, Microsoft introduced a troubleshooter that lets you hide bad updates . First, however, you must uninstall the bad update by going to Control Panel > Programs > Programs and Features > View installed updates . Highlight the update that is trashing your system and click the uninstall button that appears. Once that’s done, run the troubleshooter utility and hide the borked, banished patch from the Windows Update list.

It’s a bit of a pain, but it works. Our recommendation: Download the troubleshooter to a USB stick so it’s ready to go when disaster strikes.

Exert control over forced restarts

The anxiety over forced restarts is somewhat overstated, because Windows has for years routinely picked the optimal time to reboot after downloading updates. The issue's more pressing now if you used to download your updates manually, however—which, as we covered, you can’t do in Windows 10.

You can schedule reboots to occur at the time of your choosing by heading to Settings > Update & Security > Windows Update > Advanced Options > Choose how updates are installe d, and then choosing Notify to schedule restart in the drop-down menu at the top of the page.

Once that’s activated, you’ll be prompted via a system notification to select a specific restart time every time an update has been downloaded and your PC needs a reboot. Our tutorial on how to schedule Windows 10 update restarts has more detailed information.

Windows P2P

Microsoft came up with a great idea for delivering updates in Windows 10: peer-to-peer networking. By default your Windows 10 PC shares system files with other PCs on your home network and across the big, wide Internet, downloading and distributing updates without relying on Microsoft’s servers alone.

If you don’t like the idea of sharing your bandwidth to update strangers’ machine, turning off the P2P feature is easy. Go to Settings > Update & Security > Windows Update > Advanced Options > Choose how updates are delivered. There, turn the slider you see to Off to stop the feature entirely, or leave it on and select the PCs on my local network radio button to share updates only with other Windows 10 PCs in your home. (Personally, I like to keep the local network setting active.)

Scrolling the Apps List in the Start Menu

 

It’s great that the Start menu is back in Windows 10, but that “All apps” list organized alphabetically can be a pain to get through if you have tons of programs installed. For those times when you have to scroll down to the “W” section, click on any of the single-letter headings in the All Apps list. The alphabet will appear in the Start menu; simply select the letter section your chosen program resides in to zip there. Word, for example, would be found under W.

Very, very handy.

Where’s my default browser?

Did you just choose the Express Settings during installation during your Windows 10 upgrade? If so, then when you logged in the first time you may have discovered your browser was reset to Microsoft Edge. Here’s how to reset your default browser if that happened to you.

Go to Control Panel > Programs > Default Programs > Set your default programs . Let’s say Firefox was your browser of choice. You’d scroll through the list of programs until you saw Firefox, then you’d click on it and then choose Set this program as default. Done.

Stop Cortana from sending you to Bing

It’s no surprise that Cortana will automatically direct you to Bing for any web searches you conduct with the digital assistant. Cortana is powered by Bing, and using Bing helps Cortana learn more about you, and then better serve you in the future.

But if you’d rather stick with Google, Yahoo, Duck Duck Go, or any other search engine for your Cortana-driven web searches, there’s an easy solution: Use Firefox as your default browser.

Mozilla added a nifty feature to Firefox for Windows 10 that automatically detects Cortana-initiated searches and sends them to your default search engine in Firefox. So if Google’s your default, that’s where you’ll end up when using the Cortana-Firefox combination.

You can also achieve this on Chrome with the Chrometana extension, but in my tests Firefox was far more efficient at getting you to Google than Chrometana was.

Death to Cortana?

If you ask me, Cortana is a great help. I use Microsoft’s personal assistant on my Android phone more often than Google Now simply because of Cortana’s deep integration with Windows 10.

But if you don’t want Cortana indexing your personal information all the time—which, to be fair is really no different from what Google already does with Google Now—it’s easy to disable the assistant. Click Cortana's icon on your taskbar, select the notebook icon in her left-hand options pane, and click Settings. At the top of the next screen, simply set the slider “Cortana can give you suggestions, ideas, reminders, alerts and more” to Off. Boom! Cortana is out of your life.

After you turn off Cortana, a new option appears that includes web searches in your results even without Cortana active. If you want to stick to local files when you search for something, you can turn the web searches off too.

For a more detailed look at turning off Cortana, including how to wipe any data Microsoft has saved about you in the cloud, check out our tutorial on killing Cortana.

PDFs in Edge

Windows 8 did a lot of things wrong, but what it did right—if you ask me—is include a stock PDF reader from Microsoft. Unfortunately, it was a Windows Store app, meaning you could only use it in full-screen or that horrible Windows 8 Snap mode, which was never as good as pure desktop Snap. But when the next-best alternative was Adobe’s Reader, Microsoft’s Reader was the one Windows Store app I learned to live with.

With Windows 10, Microsoft decided not to include its PDF reader by default. Instead, the Edge browser is your default PDF reader. The change hurts because Edge stinks as a PDF reader, and Windows apps now behave well when crammed in a window on the desktop.


Microsoft Reader's icon.

Don’t despair, and definitely don’t run back to Adobe. Microsoft’s Reader app is still available in the Windows Store and you can download it for free. (If you don’t want to use a Windows Store app for PDFs, consider using Sumatra PDF or Foxit Reader instead.)

When that’s done, all you have to do is set Reader as your default for PDF documents. Head to Control Panel > Programs > Default Programs > Set your default programs . Once the installed programs list populates, scroll down and click Reader, then click Choose defaults for this program . On the next screen, click the PDF checkbox, then click Save and you’re done. You can also make Reader the default for other file types, including XPS and TIFF. If you don’t know what those file types are it’s best to leave Reader strictly for PDFs.

The same steps can also be used to set another PDF reader, like Sumatra or Foxit, as your default program.

Source: PCWorld

Falcon Wireless Direct

New2do


Voluntary Newsletter Supporters By Donation


Kansas City

mobilfone

Premium Newsletter Supporter


gcs logo

Premium Newsletter Supporter


Canyon Ridge Communications

canyon ridge

Premium Newsletter Supporter


ProPage Inc.

propage

Newsletter Supporter


Metropolitan Communications

Metropolitan

Newsletter Supporter


e*Message Wireless Information Services Europe

Newsletter Supporter



Incyte Capital Holdings LLC
Dallas, Texas

Newsletter Supporter


Le Réseau Mobilité Plus
Montreal, Quebec

reseau

Newsletter Supporter


Communication Specialists

communication specialists

Newsletter Supporter


Cook Paging

cook paging

Premium Newsletter Supporter


MethodLink

methodlink

Premium Newsletter Supporter


Citipage Ltd.
Edmonton, Alberta

citipage

Newsletter Supporter



Prism Paging

white stripe

PRISM IP MESSAGE GATEWAY

white stripe

THE ULTIMATE IN
COMMERCIAL AND PRIVATE
RADIO PAGING SYSTEMS

  • VoIP telephone access — eliminate interconnect expense
  • Call from anywhere — Prism SIP Gateway allows calls from PSTN and PBX
  • All the Features for Paging, Voice-mail, Text-to-Pager, Wireless and DECT phones
  • Prism Inet, the new IP interface for TAP, TNPP, SNPP, SMTP — Industry standard message input
  • Direct Connect to NurseCall, Assisted Living, Aged Care, Remote Monitoring, Access Control Systems

Product Support Services, Inc.

Repair and Refurbishment Services

pssi logo

pssi

Product Support Services, Inc.

511 South Royal Lane
Coppell, Texas 75019
(972) 462-3970 Ext. 261
sales@pssirl.com left arrow
www.pssirl.com left arrow

PSSI is the industry leader in reverse logistics, our services include depot repair, product returns management, RMA and RTV management, product audit, test, refurbishment, re-kitting and value recovery.



American Messaging

amsi


American Messaging

YOUR
ADVERTISEMENT COULD BE HERE


WaveWare Technologies

wavewear
sales@wirelessmessaging.com
800-373-1466
2630 National Dr., Garland, TX 75041


Now stocking the full line of Daviscomms paging products

New Products

SPS-5v9E Paging System

  • 1 Serial Port Connection
  • 2 Ethernet Connections
  • Browser and Serial Port Configuration
  • TAP, COMP2, Scope, WaveWare SNPP, COMP2, & PET Protocols
  • 2W, 5W Option

DMG Protocol Converter

  • Linux Based Embedded System
  • Up to 4 Serial Port Connections
  • Ethernet Connections
  • Browser Configuration
  • Protocol Conversion
  • TAP, XMPP, SMS, HTTP, SMTP
  • Additional Protocols Available Soon

WaveWare Technologies


Easy Solutions

easy solutions

Easy Solutions provides cost effective computer and wireless solutions at affordable prices. We can help in most any situation with your communications systems. We have many years of experience and a vast network of resources to support the industry, your system and an ever changing completive landscape.

  • We treat our customers like family. We don’t just fix problems . . . We recommend and implement better cost effective solutions.
  • We are not just another vendor . . . We are a part of your team. All the advantages of high priced full time employment without the cost.
  • We are not in the Technical Services business . . . We are in the Customer Satisfaction business.

Experts in Paging Infrastructure

  • Glenayre, Motorola, Unipage, etc.
  • Excellent Service Contracts
  • Full Service—Beyond Factory Support
  • Contracts for Glenayre and other Systems starting at $100
  • Making systems More Reliable and MORE PROFITABLE for over 30 years.

Please see our web site for exciting solutions designed specifically for the Wireless Industry. We also maintain a diagnostic lab and provide important repair and replacement parts services for Motorola and Glenayre equipment. Call or e-mail us for more information.

Easy Solutions
3220 San Simeon Way
Plano, Texas 75023

Vaughan Bowden
Telephone: 972-898-1119
Website: www.EasySolutions4You.com
E-mail: vaughan@easysolutions4you.com

Easy Solutions


Critical Response Systems

More than Paging.
First Responder Solutions.

Our patented technology notifies clinical personnel immediately, while tracking who receives and responds to each alarm. Users confirm or defer each event with a single button press, and analytic dashboards display response statistics in real time, as well as historically broken down by time, unit, room, and individual.

Our systems not only notify your personnel quickly and reliably, but also provide actionable feedback to fine-tune your procedures, reduce unnecessary alarms, and improve patient outcomes.

www.criticalresponsesystems.com

 

Leavitt Communications

leavitt

Specialists in sales and service of equipment from these leading manufacturers, as well as other two-way radio and paging products:

UNICATIONbendix king
ZETRON

motorola blue Motorola SOLUTIONS

COMmotorola red Motorola MOBILITY spacer
 usalert
Philip C. Leavitt
Manager
Leavitt Communications
7508 N. Red Ledge Drive
Paradise Valley, AZ 85253
CONTACT INFORMATION
E-mail: pcleavitt@leavittcom.com
Web Site: www.leavittcom.com
Mobile phone:847-494-0000
Telephone:847-955-0511
Fax:270-447-1909
Skype ID:pcleavitt

STI Engineering

 
sti header
 

250W VHF Paging Transmitter

STI Engineering’s RFI-148 250 high performance paging transmitter features true DDS frequency generation that enables precise control and flexibility for a wide range of data transmission applications.

The transmitter is particularly suitable for large simulcast POCSAG and FLEX paging networks and can be used as drop-in replacement of older and obsolete transmitters. The unit has a proven track record in large scale critical messaging systems.

sti tx
  • High power output
    (selectable from 20 W - 250 W)
  • SNMP Diagnostics and alarms
  • Full VHF Band coverage
    (138-174 MHz)
  • DSP precision modulation
  • Integrated isolator
  • Sniffer port for in-rack receiver
  • Remote firmware upgrade capability
  • Software selectable frequency offset
  • Adjustable absolute delay correction
  • Front panel diagnostics
  • Hardware alarm outputs
  • High frequency stability
  • External reference option
  • FCC and ACMA approved
  • CE compliant version in development
sti22 Boulder Road Malaga 6090 Western Australia
Telephone:  +61 8 9209 0900
Email:   sales@stiengineering.com.au
Facsimile:  +61 8 9248 2833
Web:   www.stiengineering.com.au

FCC Releases Agenda for Emergency Alert System Workshop

Thursday, August 20, 2015

The FCC released the agenda for its Aug. 27 workshop promoting the wider use and increased accessibility of the emergency alert system (EAS) from 1-4:30 p.m.

Sessions will cover leveraging the value proposition of EAS for state and local emergency managers, promoting wider use of EAS and promoting EAS accessibility. The full agenda is here .

Source: Mission Critical Communications

Leavitt Communications

its stil here

It’s still here — the tried and true Motorola Alphamate 250. Now owned, supported, and available from Leavitt Communications. Call us for new or reconditioned units, parts, manuals, and repairs.

We also offer refurbished Alphamate 250s, Alphamate IIs, the original Alphamate and new and refurbished pagers, pager repairs, pager parts and accessories. We are FULL SERVICE in Paging!

E-mail Phil Leavitt ( pcleavitt@leavittcom.com ) for pricing and delivery information or for a list of other available paging and two-way related equipment.

black line

Phil Leavitt
847-955-0511
pcleavitt@leavittcom.com

leavitt logo

7508 N. Red Ledge Drive
Paradise Valley, AZ 85253
www.leavittcom.com



Hark Technologies

hark logo

Wireless Communication Solutions


USB Paging Encoder

paging encoder

  • Single channel up to eight zones
  • Connects to Linux computer via USB
  • Programmable timeouts and batch sizes
  • Supports 2-tone, 5/6-tone, POCSAG 512/1200/2400, GOLAY
  • Supports Tone Only, Voice, Numeric, and Alphanumeric
  • PURC or direct connect
  • Pictured version mounts in 5.25" drive bay
  • Other mounting options available
  • Available as a daughter board for our embedded Internet Paging Terminal (IPT)

Paging Data Receiver (PDR)

pdr

  • Frequency agile—only one receiver to stock
  • USB or RS-232 interface
  • Two contact closures
  • End-user programmable w/o requiring special hardware
  • 16 capcodes
  • POCSAG
  • Eight contact closure version also available
  • Product customization available

Other products


Please see our web site for other products including Internet Messaging Gateways, Unified Messaging Servers, test equipment, and Paging Terminals.

Contact
Hark Technologies
717 Old Trolley Rd Ste 6 #163
Summerville, SC 29485
Tel: 843-821-6888
Fax: 843-821-6894
E-mail: sales@harktech.com left arrow CLICK
Web: http://www.harktech.com left arrow CLICK

Hark Technologies


Preferred Wireless

preferred logo

Terminals & Controllers:
4ASC1500 Complete, w/Spares
3CNET Platinum Controllers
2GL3100 RF Director
1GL3000 ES — 2 Chassis — Configurable
1GL3000 L — 2 Cabinets, complete working, w/spares
35SkyData 8466 B Receivers
1Unipage — Many Unipage Cards & Chassis
10Zetron M66 Transmitter Controllers
10C2000s
15Glenayre Complete GPS Kits
1Glenayre QT6994, 150W, 900 MHz Link TX
3Motorola 10W, 900 MHz Link TX (C35JZB6106)
  
Link Transmitters:
6Glenayre QT4201 25W Midband Link TX
3Motorola 10W, 900 MHz Link TX (C35JZB6106)
1Motorola Q2630A, 30W, UHF Link TX
  
VHF Paging Transmitters:
19Motorola Nucleus 125W CNET
6Motorola Nucleus 350W CNET
11Motorola Nucleus 350W NAC
14Motorola Nucleus 125W NAC
1Glenayre QT7505
1Glenayre QT8505
3Glenayre QT-100C
  
UHF Paging Transmitters:
16Glenayre UHF GLT5340, 125W, DSP Exciter
  
900 MHz Paging Transmitters:
2Glenayre GLT8200, 25W (NEW)
15Glenayre GLT-8500 250W
4Glenayre GLT 8600, 500W
  
Parts:
 Nucleus Power Supplies
 Nucleus NIU, Matched Pairs
 Nucleus GPS Reference Modules
 Nucleus GPS Receivers
 Nucleus Chassis
 Glenayre 8500, PAs, PSs, DSP Exciters
 Glenayre VHF DSP Exciters

SEE WEB FOR COMPLETE LIST:

www.preferredwireless.com/equipment left arrow


Too Much To List • Call or E-Mail

Rick McMichael
Preferred Wireless, Inc.
888-429-4171 rickm@preferredwireless.com left arrow


Preferred Wireless

 


How to Make Great Use Of Blackberry’s QWERTY Keyboard

By Matthew Barnes - Aug 27, 2015
TECHMalak

BlackBerry’s QWERTY keyboard is widely considered by many as the best typing experience you can have on a mobile phone currently.

While the majority of smartphone users gravitate towards the touch screen, there remains a select few who absolutely love a physical keyboard.

Comfortable rows of keys will greet your fingers every time a Text, BBM, Email and web search or Social Media needs to be performed on a BlackBerry Device.

BlackBerry has been in the business of making mobile keyboards since the mid-90’s when it launched the very first Research In Motion device known as the Interactive Pager 900.


Interactive Pager 900

The Interactive Pager allowed users to send and receive messages over a wireless data network, and help put the company on the map for its mobile devices and technology.

The BlackBerry Classic returned to its roots by appealing to its core user-base with not only that iconic keyboard which is loved by many, but also with the return of the famous tool belt.

Rumors are abound, about the next BlackBerry device running on the Android OS, with a slide-out QWERTY keyboard with impressive high-end specs.

BlackBerry’s keyboard is a dependable and simple solution to stay productive in today’s world.

And with the BB10 Operating System, there are new ways to experience the QWERTY keyboard with the use of shortcuts that allows you to be more efficient while using your smartphone.

Here are 10 default shortcuts which are very useful for navigating around the BlackBerry Classic in the BB10 OS:

  1. Launch Help: H
  2. Open Contacts/Address Book: A
  3. Launch Settings: O
  4. Change Notifications to Silent: Q
  5. Lock The BlackBerry : K
  6. Launch BBM: N
  7. Launch the Calculator: U
  8. Launch the Weather App: W
  9. Create a Message In the BlackBerry Hub: C
  10. Launch the Browser: B

Other tips:

While in the BlackBerry Hub you can press T to reach the very top of your messages, or press B to go to the very bottom.

To assign new keyboard shortcut you can.

  1. Go to settings
  2. Shortcuts and Speed Dial
  3. Press and hold the key you want to assign or touch the screen to the corresponding letter or number
  4. Choose the what you want the key to do from the list
  5. And then choose the application to launch

To edit an existing shortcut you can:

  1. Go to settings
  2. Shortcuts and Speed Dial
  3. Press and hold an existing shortcut assigned key
  4. Tap Edit A Shortcut
  5. From the list choose what you want the key to do
  6. Assign the key to an application to launch

You can customize your keyboard to your tailored needs as often as you would like.

This gives users a true personalized feel to their device which fans from around the world have praised Blackberry for years about.

Privacy is a right most of us take for granted in this digital information age of touch screen devices and social media accounts.

Among Android iOS and Windows Phone, BlackBerry still ranks no. 1 for security and privacy.

Users don’t fear typing in sensitive data on a BlackBerry as they would with rival manufacturers because of Blackberry’s patented data encryption services across their trusted network.

That means your data is safe against hacking, malware and any other man-in-the-middle attacks.

This is among the top reasons why governments and huge multinational corporations trust BlackBerry to deliver strong and powerful results when it comes to security.

If you want to get work done on your mobile device, using a BlackBerry is the way to go.

An Easy customizable QWERTY keyboard with shortcuts, dependable privacy, security settings and a strong forum to complete your work flow, makes using a BlackBerry the right choice.

Source: TECHMalak

Critical Alert

spacer cas logo

Critical Alert Systems, Inc.

Formed in 2010, CAS brought together the resources and capabilities of two leading critical messaging solutions providers, UCOM™ and Teletouch™ Paging, along with lntego Systems™, a pioneer in next-generation nurse call systems. The result was an organization that represented more than 40 years of combined experience serving hospitals and healthcare providers.

CAS was created to be a single-source provider for hospitals and healthcare facilities in need of advanced nurse call and communications technologies.

Unlike our competitors, our product development process embraced the power of software from its inception. This enables us to design hardware-agnostic solutions focused on built-in integration, flexibility and advanced performance.

LEARN MORE

Nurse Call Solutions

Innovation in Nurse Call

Innovative, software-based nurse call solutions for acute and long-term care organizations.

LEARN MORE

Paging Solutions

The Most Reliable Paging Network

To this day, for critical messaging, nothing beats paging. It’s simply the best way to deliver a critical message.

LEARN MORE

spacer

Copyright 2015 - Critical Alert Systems, Inc.


BloostonLaw Newsletter

Selected portions of the BloostonLaw Telecom Update, and/or the BloostonLaw Private Users Update — newsletters from the Law Offices of Blooston, Mordkofsky, Dickens, Duffy & Prendergast, LLP — are reproduced in this section with the firm’s permission.


BloostonLaw Telecom UpdateVol. 18, No. 32August 25, 2015

Special Edition


FCC Denies AWS-3 Auction Discounts for DISH Network Partners

As expected, the FCC voted unanimously on Monday to deny $3.3 billion in small business bidding credits to DISH Network Corp. affiliates Northstar Wireless, LLC (“Northstar”) and SNR Wireless LicenseCo, LLC (“SNR”) in connection with the AWS-3 auction (Auction 97) that ended last January. The ruling was adopted in a Memorandum Opinion and Order (FCC 15-104) that was released on Tuesday.

The FCC’s decision comes after a contested months-long review of the Northstar and SNR long-form applications and assessment of DISH’s financial and operating ties to the two companies. The Wall Street Journal reported last month that an order with staff recommendation to deny the small business eligibility claims of Northstar and SNR was circulating on the FCC’s Eighth Floor. See July 22 BloostonLaw Telecom Update.

With the denial, the Wall Street Journal cited DISH Chairman Charlie Ergen as saying the company had three options: refuse to buy the spectrum and pay a penalty; pay the additional $3.3 billion; or sue the FCC to overturn the decision.

DISH said it was disappointed in the FCC’s decision because it had complied with all legal requirements in its bidding. “We will the review the order when it becomes available, as we consider our options going forward,” said DISH’s general counsel, R. Stanton Dodge.

By way of background, Northstar was the winning bidder for 345 of the 1614 licenses being auctioned in Auction 97, with a total of $5,883,794,550 in net provisionally winning bids, and SNR was the winning bidder for 357 of the 1614 auctioned licenses, with a total of $4,111,773,225 in net provisionally winning bids. SNR and Northstar each asserted that it had less than $15 million in gross revenues over the past three years and was therefore qualified as a “very small business” Designated Entity (“DE”) under the Auction 97 rules. SNR and Northstar both claimed that they were not controlled by DISH, notwithstanding the fact that they are each 85 percent indirectly owned and capitalized by DISH, that DISH had agreed to manage their operations and build-out, and that DISH would operate and maintain their networks.
Based on the record of each of the applications and petitions to deny, the FCC concluded that DISH has a controlling interest in SNR and Northstar, and under the DE rules DISH’s gross revenues for 2011, 2012 and 2013 must be attributed to each of the applicants. Once DISH’s gross revenues are attributed to SNR and Northstar, each applicant is ineligible for small business bidding credits.

As a result of the ruling, Northstar will be on the hook for $1.96 billion in additional payments, while SNR will be required to pay an additional $1.37 billion, if DISH wants to keep the spectrum licenses. Both companies have been ordered within 30 days to submit their additional payments, or to provide an irrevocable standby letter of credit in the amount of their additional payment that the Commission may draw upon if the full balance is not paid within 120 days. Failure of either company to complete payment or deliver the letter of credit by September 17th will result in a default, and additional default payments will be due under the rules.

“Today, our review of two winning bidders in the recent AWS-3 auction has concluded that they in fact are not eligible for bidding credits,” said FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler in a written statement issued on Monday. “I’m proud that our thorough, fact-based analysis ensures that bidding credits only go to the small businesses our rules aim to serve.”

Commissioner Mignon Clyburn, a staunch defender of the FCC’s DE program, concurred in the Commission’s ruling but issued a separate statement to highlight what she saw as an “unfortunate” result for Northstar and SNR, because she believed these entities “obviously lacked bargaining power when negotiating these agreements.” She also cited to the fact that the applicants’ LLC agreements each provide that if the applicants fail to qualify for bidding credits, that DISH will make the required payments to the Commission and the applicants much transfer all of their AWS-3 licenses to DISH.

“I hope this case will not have an undue chilling effect on the ability of small businesses to enter into relationships with large investors,” wrote Clyburn.

A statement from Commissioner Ajit Pai concluded that DISH maintains an extensive level of control over SNR and Northstar, thus eliminating any possibility that they are independent small businesses. In referring to the wide-ranging investor protections, Pai wrote: “Taken as a whole, these and the many other controls DISH put in place go far beyond any legitimate protections for an arm’s length investor. They smack instead of the wizard controlling the entire show from behind the curtain.”

Pai’s statement also noted the FCC staff’s analysis showed nearly 4,000 instances of coordinated bidding. “This includes hundreds of cases where all three companies placed the exact same bid on the exact same license in the exact same round. This and other forms of coordination gave the DISH entities a significant advantage over every other bidder in the auction. This conduct not only sent false signals regarding the level of demand in particular markets, but also allowed the DISH entities to maintain bidding eligibility deeper into the auction and raise costs on other bidders.”

The FCC’s Memorandum Opinion and Order and revocation of bidding credits do not necessarily end the government’s inquiry. Regardless of compliance with the Commission’s rules, such as the prior disclosure of joint bidding agreements between DISH and its DEs in the parties’ auction applications, applicants remain subject to the antitrust laws, which are designed to prevent anticompetitive behavior in the marketplace. The Commission declined to refer the matter to the Justice Department, but it will now be up to the Antitrust Division to decide whether any conduct exhibited during the auction violates antitrust law, and whether it plans to institute further investigation or action against DISH or its DEs on its own motion.

Deadlines


AUGUST 29: COPYRIGHT STATEMENT OF ACCOUNTS. The Copyright Statement of Accounts form plus royalty payment for the first half of calendar year 2015 is due to be filed August 29 at the Library of Congress’ Copyright Office by cable TV service providers.

SEPTEMBER 1: FCC FORM 477, LOCAL COMPETITION AND BROADBAND REPORTING FORM. Three types of entities must file this form. (1) Facilities-based Providers of Broadband Connections to End User Locations: Entities that are facilities-based providers of broadband connections — which are wired “lines” or wireless “channels” that enable the end user to receive information from and/or send information to the Internet at information transfer rates exceeding 200 kbps in at least one direction — must complete and file the applicable portions of this form for each state in which the entity provides one or more such connections to end user locations. For the purposes of Form 477, an entity is a “facilities-based” provider of broadband connections to end user locations if it owns the portion of the physical facility that terminates at the end user location, if it obtains unbundled network elements (UNEs), special access lines, or other leased facilities that terminate at the end user location and provisions/equips them as broadband, or if it provisions/equips a broadband wireless channel to the end user location over licensed or unlicensed spectrum. Such entities include incumbent and competitive local exchange carriers (LECs), cable system operators, fixed wireless service providers (including “wireless ISPs”), terrestrial and satellite mobile wireless service providers, MMDS providers, electric utilities, municipalities, and other entities. (Such entities do not include equipment suppliers unless the equipment supplier uses the equipment to provision a broadband connection that it offers to the public for sale. Such entities also do not include providers of fixed wireless services (e.g., “Wi-Fi” and other wireless ethernet, or wireless local area network, applications) that only enable local distribution and sharing of a premises broadband facility.) (2) Providers of Wired or Fixed Wireless Local Telephone Services: Incumbent and competitive LECs must complete and file the applicable portions of the form for each state in which they provide local exchange service to one or more end user customers (which may include “dial-up” ISPs). (3) Providers of Interconnected Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) Service: Interconnected VoIP service is a service that enables real-time, two-way voice communications; requires a broadband connection from the user’s location; requires Internet-protocol compatible customer premises equipment; and permits users generally to receive calls that originate on the public switched telephone network and to terminate calls to the public switched telephone network. Interconnected VoIP providers must complete and file the applicable portions of the form for each state in which they provide interconnected VoIP service to one or more subscribers, with the state determined for reporting purposes by the location of the subscriber’s broadband connection or the subscriber’s “Registered Location” as of the data-collection date. “Registered Location” is the most recent information obtained by an interconnected VoIP service provider that identifies the physical location of an end user. (4) Providers of Mobile Telephony Services: Facilities-based providers of mobile telephony services must complete and file the applicable portions of this form for each state in which they serve one or more mobile telephony subscribers. A mobile telephony service is a real-time, two-way switched voice service that is interconnected with the public switched network using an in-network switching facility that enables the provider to reuse frequencies and accomplish seamless handoff of subscriber calls. A mobile telephony service provider is considered “facilities-based” if it serves a subscriber using spectrum for which the entity holds a license that it manages, or for which it has obtained the right to use via lease or other arrangement with a Band Manager.

SEPTEMBER 30: FCC FORM 396-C, MVPD EEO PROGRAM REPORTING FORM. Each year on September 30, multi-channel video program distributors (“MVPDs”) must file with the Commission an FCC Form 396-C, Multi-Channel Video Programming Distributor EEO Program Annual Report, for employment units with six or more full-time employees. Users must access the FCC’s electronic filing system via the Internet in order to submit the form; it will not be accepted if filed on paper unless accompanied by an appropriate request for waiver of the electronic filing requirement. Certain MVPDs also will be required to complete portions of the Supplemental Investigation Sheet (“SIS”) located at the end of the Form. These MVPDs are specifically identified in a Public Notice each year by the FCC.

Calendar At-a-Glance


August
Aug. 29 – Copyright Statement of Accounts is due.

September
Sep. 1 – FCC Form 477 due (Local Competition and Broadband Report).
Sep. 4 – Reply comments are due on Transparency Exemption proceeding.
Sep. 15 – Reply comments on Lifeline Further Notice of Proposed Rulemaking are due.
Sep. 21 – Reply comments are due on Video Programming Competition report.
Sep. 25 – Comments are due on Section IV.B of the Special Access Data NPRM.
Sep. 30 – FCC Form 396-C (MVPD EEO Program Annual Report).

October
Oct. 15 – Initial 911 Reliability Certification


BloostonLaw Telecom UpdateVol. 18, No. 33August 28, 2015

Special Edition


600 MHz Broadcast Incentive Auction to Begin on March 29, 2016

Auction Procedures and Next Steps

Earlier this month, the FCC adopted its Incentive Auction Bidding Procedures Public Notice (FCC 15-78). In addition to establishing March 29, 2016 as the start date of the first-ever incentive auction, the Bidding Procedures PN establishes a procedure for selecting the initial clearing target ( i.e., the amount of repurposed 600 MHz spectrum that will be offered for bid); it establishes a formula for calculating opening price offers for each eligible TV station based on its interference and population characteristics; it establishes a methodology for setting auction upfront payments and minimum opening bids; and it ensures that wireless companies receive detailed information about “impaired” licenses in a given area, including “Category 1” blocks with potential impairments that affect 0% - 15% of the geographic area population, and “Category 2” blocks with potential impairments that affect greater than 15% and up to 50% of the POPs. As discussed below, the 600 MHz auction will easily be the most complicated spectrum auction ever held; and in an effort to curb abuses in recent auctions, the FCC has adopted certain rules (such as elimination of the bidding “waivers” that allowed you to sit out a few rounds) that will make participation a bit tougher.

This article is designed to give our clients a high-level overview of how the incentive auction will work. The FCC’s wireless bureau has a web site that explains in great detail about the Incentive Auction process – including the reverse auction, the forward auction and repacking of the TV Bands — at http://wireless.fcc.gov/incentiveauctions/learn-program/index.html. FCC staff will also offer a number of training workshops, webinars and an interactive online tutorial this fall before applications are due. We strongly urge our clients who may be interested in bidding for 600 MHz licenses to review the Bidding Procedures PN carefully and to take advantage of the resources available on the FCC’s LEARN web site.

The various application and upfront payment deadlines have not yet been finalized by the Commission, but assuming the FCC sticks to an end-of-March start date, short-form applications will likely be due sometime in November or possibly December . The FCC will need a good amount of time to review short form applications because it will have applications both from TV broadcasters that wish to participate in the reverse auction as well as from wireless carriers that want to bid in the forward auction. After the customary round of short-form amendments, where applicants may be asked to supplement their applications, upfront payments for eligible participants in the forward auction will likely be due in late February of 2016. Because the application deadline is just around the corner, clients who may be interested in bidding should be getting themselves organized now. Attorneys from our law firm are available to assist in formation of a bidding entity and maximizing eligibility for Designated Entity (DE) bidding credits.

The incentive auction is unlike the traditional “simultaneous multiple round” (or “SMR”) auctions that the FCC has held in the past, such as the 700 MHz auctions and recent AWS-3 auction. It is far more complex. The proceeding actually involves two auctions — a “reverse” auction in which TV broadcasters can volunteer to give up some or all of their spectrum usage rights (a.k.a, “Auction 1001”), and a “forward” auction of new, flexible-use 600 MHz Band licenses that are suitable for providing mobile broadband services (a.k.a., “Auction 1002”). An overview of the incentive auction design follows below.

Incentive Auction Design

The Incentive Auction will consist of a reverse auction in which broadcasters may voluntarily choose to relinquish some or all of their spectrum usage rights, and a forward auction in which the relinquished spectrum is made available to wireless providers. The rules integrate the reverse and forward auctions in a series of stages; each stage will consist of a reverse auction followed by a forward auction bidding process aimed at a specific clearing target. Broadcasters who choose to participate in the auction will have several options for relinquishing their spectrum usage rights — going off the air, moving from a UHF to a VHF channel, or sharing a channel with another broadcaster. The reverse auction will use a descending clock format in which the prices offered to broadcasters for their spectrum usage rights will drop with each successive round of bidding until the lowest price to clear the required amount of spectrum is established. The forward auction will use a multiple round ascending clock format in which the prices will generally rise from round to round as long as the demand for licenses exceeds the amount available. The auction will close when the auction meets the “final stage rule”; namely, when the auction proceeds meet a specific reserve that will be determined by the Commission ( i.e., the auction has pulled in enough funds to ensure that the FCC has the money needed to move the broadcasters, and otherwise recover the value of the spectrum for the public). If the final stage rule is not satisfied, the clearing target will be reduced and another stage of the auction will begin.

2 months before short-form application deadline

Two months out (likely in September), the FCC will issue a Public Notice with opening prices for broadcast TV stations to relinquish their spectrum rights. Opening prices will start high, in order to encourage as many broadcasters to participate as possible. Each station will be assigned a “volume” factor that is based on the station’s size and value toward repacking the broadcast spectrum. Thus, larger stations that are “lynchpins” to the repacking process will be valued more highly. An initial “clock price” of $900 per unit of volume will be set for a UHF station to relinquish its spectrum (or to enter into a facilities sharing agreement with another broadcaster, which will have the same practical effect. Opening price offers for bid options other than a UHF station bidding for off-air relinquishment will be calculated by multiplying fractional portions of the nationwide uniform $900 base clock price by a station’s volume.

  • $900 x volume for UHF station to go off air
  • $675 x volume for moving from UHF to low VHF
  • $360 x volume for moving from UHF to high VHF

Other starting clock prices for various station moves are shown below

Short-form filing deadline – November/December 2015

Broadcast TV stations that wish to participate in the Incentive Auction will have two months to decide whether to accept a specific starting price to relinquish their station or to move to a different (lower) portion of the broadcast band. On the short-form filing deadline, broadcasters will express a preference for the type of relinquishment offer they are willing to accept. Broadcasters that chose not to participate will be permitted to stay in their current portion of the broadcast band ( i.e., UHF, High-VHF or Low-VHF), but they may be required to move to a different channel within their band segment to accommodate the “repacking” process that will free up 600 MHz spectrum (in the upper portion of the UHF band) for the provision of mobile broadband services.

Based on the initial elections that the FCC receives, the auction software will process the initial commitments, designate stations that can be accommodated to an initial relinquishment option, then the FCC will send confidential letters to each of the reverse auction participants, indicating either that

  1. the station is qualified to participate in the clock phase of the reverse auction;
  2. the station is not qualified because no initial commitment was made, and therefore, that station will be designated to be repacked in its pre-auction band;
  3. the commitment(s) made by the applicant for the station could not be accommodated, and therefore, that station is not qualified and will be designated to be repacked in its pre-auction band, or
  4. the auction system determined that the station is not needed, and therefore, the station is not qualified and will be designated to be repacked in its pre-auction band.

Based on the initial commitments from the broadcasters, the FCC will adopt an initial spectrum clearing “target” that will establish the number of 5 megahertz x 5 megahertz paired-channel block licenses will be available for bidding in the forward auction. Because the FCC will not know the exact number of licenses or their frequencies when the incentive auction begins, the 600 MHz Band Plan includes different band plan scenarios associated with different spectrum clearing targets. Figure 1 shows the band plan scenario associated with each potential spectrum clearing target, along with the number of paired blocks offered in each band plan.


Figure 1: Band Plan Scenarios

After the FCC sets its initial clearing target and adopts an initial 600 MHz band plan, the FCC will set upfront payment amounts for generic blocks in every PEA for Auction 1002 in a forthcoming Application Procedures Public Notice. The upfront payment amount will be $2,500 per bidding unit, which is half of the opening bid for each spectrum block. Thus, to become a qualified bidder, a forward auction applicant must make an upfront payment sufficient to obtain bidding eligibility for the quantity of generic blocks in each PEA on which it may wish to bid in any round. Because bidding unit amounts pertain to a single paired 5+5 megahertz block for each PEA, a bidder that wishes to bid on multiple generic blocks within a PEA simultaneously will need to ensure that its upfront payment provides enough eligibility to cover more than one paired 5+5 megahertz generic block in the PEA.

Forward Auction Bidding Process

As noted above, the Commission adopted an ascending clock auction format for the forward auction. Based on the size of their upfront payment (which establishes bidding eligibility), bidders will be able to bid for one or more generic “Category 1” or “Category 2” license blocks in their PEA market(s) of interest. There will be a separate clock price for each category in each geographic area, and bidders will indicate the number of licenses that they would like to win at the current prices. Thus, all licenses of the same category within the same PEA will be priced the same. Prices will steadily increase for all available spectrum blocks from round to round, so long as the demand for licenses exceeds their availability. Bidders still demanding licenses when the clock prices stop rising in every license category in every area will become winners of those licenses provided the “final stage” rule is satisfied. If the rule is not satisfied, those bidders will have an opportunity to make additional bids in an extended bidding round.
Once the rule is satisfied, the forward auction Once the rule is satisfied, the forward auction moves to an “assignment phase” where winners in the “clock phase” may indicate their preferences for frequency-specific licenses in a series of separate bidding rounds. Final license prices will reflect the winning bid amounts from the clock bidding rounds as well as any adjustments from the extended bidding and assignment rounds.

In order to ensure that the auction moves quickly, forward auction bidders will be required to maintain a minimum level of activity in each round of the auction in order to maintain bidding eligibility. Unlike previous auctions with which our clients are familiar, which may start with an activity requirement of 80 percent and progress to 90 or 95 percent as bidding draws to a close, the incentive auction will begin with a 95 percent activity requirement. Thus, smaller bidders in the forward auction will not have as much flexibility to change between different bidding strategies involving different combinations of PEAs, but instead will pretty much have to bid on exactly what they want from the beginning (and keep bidding). Under the “clock auction” format, the auction system will require bidders to reconfirm their bids in every round, and the Commission has decided not to provide bidders with any activity rule waivers. Therefore, there will be no more “casually” watching the auction if you are the high bidder, to see if anyone tops your bid.

While the clock auction format will involve prices rising steadily from round-to-round, and the high activity level required from the start of bidding should limit the ability of bidders to jump back and forth between markets, we are concerned that not allowing any activity rule waivers leaves ZERO room for error in a new and novel auction process and could be prejudicial to small bidders. Nationwide and regional carriers are in a position to hire teams of analysts to conduct their bidding, and have backup systems in place should unexpected circumstances arise. Smaller bidders do not have this luxury. We are therefore considering the possibility of filing a Petition for Reconsideration on this issue and proposing that the Commission allow smaller bidders to have at least two (2) waivers, as a fail-safe. We expect to circulate a draft petition for our clients to review in the coming weeks, as the Bidding Procedures PN has not yet been published in the Federal Register.

Final Stage Rule

The “final stage rule” establishes reserve price conditions that, when met, will determine that bidding in the incentive auction will end with the current stage and clearing target. In this regard, the Commission has adopted a $1.25 per MHz-POP average price for Category 1 blocks in high-demand PEAs and 70 megahertz licensed spectrum clearing benchmark as the first component of the final stage rule, which aims to ensure that winning bids in the forward auction reflect competitive prices. The second component of the final stage rule ensures that the revenue from the forward auction is sufficient to cover all of the mandatory costs and expenses set forth in the Spectrum Act.

As long as the final stage rule has not yet been met, the auction system will evaluate after each round of forward auction bidding whether forward auction proceeds are sufficient to satisfy the two components of the final stage rule. The auction system will make the needed calculations as part of the round results processing in order to establish as soon as possible whether the incentive auction will conclude after forward auction bidding ends at the current clearing target. Data indicating the progress of the auction in meeting the various components of the final stage rule will be made public after each round of the forward auction.

Forward Auction Stopping Procedures

The auction system will employ a simultaneous stopping rule for the clock phase of the forward auction in the final stage. Specifically, if the final stage rule has been met, the clock phase of bidding will end for all categories of licenses following the first round in which there is no excess demand in any category of spectrum in any PEA. Forward auction bidders that are still actively bidding for a category of a PEA at the time the stopping rule is met will become the winning bidders, and will be assigned specific frequencies in the assignment phase.

After bidding in the forward auction clock phase meets the conditions of the stopping rule, the results of the forward auction clock phase will determine the winning bidders for categories of generic blocks of flexible-use 600 MHz Band licenses. The forward auction will move to an assignment phase that will determine the frequency-specific blocks won by each winning bidder of generic blocks. The assignment phase will not alter the number of blocks a winning bidder receives in each PEA and license category, but winning bidders will have the opportunity to bid even more money if they want specific frequencies, or want contiguous channel blocks. The results of bidding in the forward auction clock phase and any additional bidding in the assignment phase will determine the total amount paid for frequency-specific 600 MHz Band licenses.

Next Steps - Roadmap

We describe below some critical next steps for the 600 MHz auction process, and discuss the actions that the FCC will take after the auction applications are submitted.

Application Procedures Public Notice. In early fall, the FCC will release an Application Procedures Public Notice. This will describe the nuts and bolts of the auction application process and post-auction procedures, including the opening dates for the application filing windows, the filing deadline, the schedule for mock auctions, and the information required on auction application forms.

Opening Bid Prices – Reverse Auction. The FCC will publicly announce the reverse auction opening bid prices for all broadcasters no later than 60 days before the deadline for reverse auction applications established in the Application Procedures Public Notice. The opening bid prices will be calculated using the formula already adopted by the Commission in the Bidding Procedures Public Notice, applying the final TV-to-TV constraints and interference-free population data for each station.

Opening Bid Prices – Forward Auction. For the forward auction, the Bidding Procedures Public Notice established the upfront payment and opening bid prices per bidding unit, described how bidding units are calculated for each Partial Economic Are (PEA), and explained when upfront payments would be due. This fall the FCC will release the final table of bidding units in each PEA so that potential applicants can plan for making their upfront payments.

Commencing the Auction. After the FCC releases the information described above, it will open the windows for applications to participate in the reverse and forward auction. These application windows will close before the end of the year. After the application deadline, FCC staff will review the applications for completeness and accuracy. Broadcasters will have the opportunity to make minor modifications or corrections necessary to complete their applications, and then, by March 29, 2016, each participating broadcaster that has completed an application must commit to its preferred initial bid option. That commitment will bind the broadcaster to relinquishing its spectrum usage rights at the opening price applicable to its preferred option. If, in the auction itself, the price offered to the broadcaster drops, the broadcaster is no longer bound to relinquish its spectrum unless it elects to remain in the auction at the lower price.

After the applications are filed and the broadcasters make their initial commitments, the auction system will determine the initial clearing target and associated band plan. Reverse auction participants will have the opportunity to participate in a mock auction, and then the reverse auction bidding rounds will begin.

Forward auction applicants with complete applications that wish to become qualified to bid will be required to make their upfront payments after the clearing target and band plan are announced. After upfront payments are made, qualified forward auction bidders will also have an opportunity to participate in a mock auction. The first round of the forward auction will commence no sooner than 15 business days after the FCC releases the list of qualified forward auction bidders.

FCC On-Line Systems Unavailable From September 2 through September 8

The FCC has announced that it will be upgrading its IT systems over the Labor Day weekend – starting at 6:00 PM on Wednesday, September 2nd through 8:00 AM on Tuesday, September 8th. During this upgrade, almost all of the FCC’s systems, including the Universal Licensing System (ULS), the Electronic Comment Filing System (ECFS) and the Electronic Document Management System (EDOCS) will be unavailable. As a result, the FCC has announced that it is extending filing deadlines that would be made over these systems to Wednesday, September 9, 2015.

The FCC has indicated that its Network Outage Reporting System (NORS), the Consumer Help Center (CHC) and the Disaster Information Reporting System (DIRS) will remain available. Additionally, the FCC will remain open and be under normal operations — to include the FCC’s filing window for the Secretary’s Office for paper filings.

Deadlines


AUGUST 29: COPYRIGHT STATEMENT OF ACCOUNTS. The Copyright Statement of Accounts form plus royalty payment for the first half of calendar year 2015 is due to be filed August 29 at the Library of Congress’ Copyright Office by cable TV service providers.

SEPTEMBER 1: FCC FORM 477, LOCAL COMPETITION AND BROADBAND REPORTING FORM. Three types of entities must file this form. (1) Facilities-based Providers of Broadband Connections to End User Locations: Entities that are facilities-based providers of broadband connections — which are wired “lines” or wireless “channels” that enable the end user to receive information from and/or send information to the Internet at information transfer rates exceeding 200 kbps in at least one direction — must complete and file the applicable portions of this form for each state in which the entity provides one or more such connections to end user locations. For the purposes of Form 477, an entity is a “facilities-based” provider of broadband connections to end user locations if it owns the portion of the physical facility that terminates at the end user location, if it obtains unbundled network elements (UNEs), special access lines, or other leased facilities that terminate at the end user location and provisions/equips them as broadband, or if it provisions/equips a broadband wireless channel to the end user location over licensed or unlicensed spectrum. Such entities include incumbent and competitive local exchange carriers (LECs), cable system operators, fixed wireless service providers (including “wireless ISPs”), terrestrial and satellite mobile wireless service providers, MMDS providers, electric utilities, municipalities, and other entities. (Such entities do not include equipment suppliers unless the equipment supplier uses the equipment to provision a broadband connection that it offers to the public for sale. Such entities also do not include providers of fixed wireless services ( e.g. , “Wi-Fi” and other wireless ethernet, or wireless local area network, applications) that only enable local distribution and sharing of a premises broadband facility.) (2) Providers of Wired or Fixed Wireless Local Telephone Services: Incumbent and competitive LECs must complete and file the applicable portions of the form for each state in which they provide local exchange service to one or more end user customers (which may include “dial-up” ISPs). (3) Providers of Interconnected Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) Service: Interconnected VoIP service is a service that enables real-time, two-way voice communications; requires a broadband connection from the user’s location; requires Internet-protocol compatible customer premises equipment; and permits users generally to receive calls that originate on the public switched telephone network and to terminate calls to the public switched telephone network. Interconnected VoIP providers must complete and file the applicable portions of the form for each state in which they provide interconnected VoIP service to one or more subscribers, with the state determined for reporting purposes by the location of the subscriber’s broadband connection or the subscriber’s “Registered Location” as of the data-collection date. “Registered Location” is the most recent information obtained by an interconnected VoIP service provider that identifies the physical location of an end user. (4) Providers of Mobile Telephony Services: Facilities-based providers of mobile telephony services must complete and file the applicable portions of this form for each state in which they serve one or more mobile telephony subscribers. A mobile telephony service is a real-time, two-way switched voice service that is interconnected with the public switched network using an in-network switching facility that enables the provider to reuse frequencies and accomplish seamless handoff of subscriber calls. A mobile telephony service provider is considered “facilities-based” if it serves a subscriber using spectrum for which the entity holds a license that it manages, or for which it has obtained the right to use via lease or other arrangement with a Band Manager.

SEPTEMBER 30: FCC FORM 396-C, MVPD EEO PROGRAM REPORTING FORM. Each year on September 30, multi-channel video program distributors (“MVPDs”) must file with the Commission an FCC Form 396-C, Multi-Channel Video Programming Distributor EEO Program Annual Report, for employment units with six or more full-time employees. Users must access the FCC’s electronic filing system via the Internet in order to submit the form; it will not be accepted if filed on paper unless accompanied by an appropriate request for waiver of the electronic filing requirement. Certain MVPDs also will be required to complete portions of the Supplemental Investigation Sheet (“SIS”) located at the end of the Form. These MVPDs are specifically identified in a Public Notice each year by the FCC.

Calendar At-a-Glance


August
Aug. 29 – Copyright Statement of Accounts is due.

September
Sep. 1 – FCC Form 477 due (Local Competition and Broadband Report).
Sep. 4 – Reply comments are due on Transparency Exemption proceeding.
Sep. 15 – Reply comments on Lifeline Further Notice of Proposed Rulemaking are due.
Sep. 21 – Reply comments are due on Video Programming Competition report.
Sep. 25 – Comments are due on Section IV.B of the Special Access Data NPRM.
Sep. 30 – FCC Form 396-C (MVPD EEO Program Annual Report).

October
Oct. 15 – Initial 911 Reliability Certification

This newsletter is not intended to provide legal advice. Those interested in more information should contact the firm. For additional information, please contact Hal Mordkofsky at 202-828-5520 or halmor@bloostonlaw.com .

Friends & Colleagues


Ira Wiesenfeld, P.E.

Complete Technical Services For The Communications and Electronics Industries Design • Installation • Maintenance • Training • Engineering • Licensing • Technical Assistance

black line

Ira Wiesenfeld, P.E.
Consulting Engineer
Registered Professional Engineer

Tel/Fax: 972-960-9336
Cell: 214-707-7711
Web: IWA-RADIO.com
7711 Scotia Dr.
Dallas, TX 75248-3112
E-mail: iwiesenfel@aol.com

Ira Wiesenfeld, P.E.

Consulting Alliance

Brad Dye, Ron Mercer, Allan Angus, Vic Jackson, and Ira Wiesenfeld are friends and colleagues who work both together and independently, on wireline and wireless communications projects.

Click here left arrow for a summary of their qualifications and experience. Each one has unique abilities. We would be happy to help you with a project, and maybe save you some time and money.

Note: We do not like Patent Trolls, i.e. a person or company who enforces patent rights against accused infringers in an attempt to collect licensing fees, but does not manufacture products or supply services based upon the patents in question. We have helped some prominent law firms defend their clients against this annoyance, and would be happy to do some more of this same kind of work.

“If you would know the road ahead, ask someone who has traveled it.”
— Chinese Proverb

“He knows the water best who has waded through it.”
— Danish Proverb


Consulting Alliance


Wireless Network Planners

Wireless Network Planners
Wireless Specialists

www.wirelessplanners.com
wirelessplannerron@gmail.com

R.H. (Ron) Mercer
Consultant
217 First Street
East Northport, NY 11731

ron mercer
Telephone: 631-786-9359

Wireless Network Planners


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

From:Tom Harger tharger@selectpath.com
Subject: The Wireless Messaging News for Tom Harger
Date:August 21, 2015
To:Brad Dye

Enjoyed the article on Grace Hopper.

I actually got to meet her back in the mid 70s. She was traveling the country at the time giving a talk on computers, etc. She came to the junior-college I had attended where I worked on a “Data Processing” associates degree (never finished though). She presented everyone in the audience with a “nanosecond.” A piece of wire just under a foot long. This was in reference to the problems of making computers faster and the decrease in size required.

I was currently programming a computer (in COBOL) that had a 2.5 microsecond cycle time. Each instruction took 2.5 msec to complete. A bit slower then the processors today. ;-) It filled up a rather large room. Times have changed.

It was fun remembering those days. Thanks for posting the article.

TH


Editor: It's always good to hear from you Tom. I too, have been inspired by this amazing lady, who accomplished so much in the early days of computers. Some folks call her “Amazing Grace.”


From:Roy Pottle Roy.Pottle@americanmessaging.net
Subject:  Mike Montague
Date:August 21, 2015
To:Tom Cook tomcook@tlcpmc.com

-------- Original Message --------
From: Roy Pottle
Sent: Wednesday, August 26, 2015 5:39 PM
To: All Employees
Subject: Mike Montague

All,

It is with much sadness that I write to let you know that earlier today Mike Montague passed away after a long battle with cancer.  Shortly after closing our acquisition of Cook Telecom, Inc. I met with Mike at our offices in Hayward, CA to review network integration plans.  Within minutes of our meeting it was very clear that Mike was a unique leader with a quiet, but incredibly effective demeanor.  Mike had a unique ability to put everyone around him at ease while simultaneously soliciting individual opinions in a gentle but effective manner. Mike was always the adult in the room — a wise and thoughtful gentleman.  Accordingly, we benefited immensely when Mike accepted our offer to join American Messaging as our Vice President, Network Operations and to move to Lewisville, TX.

Mike’s impact was immediate, bringing calm to the otherwise hectic reality of Network Operations.  Even as Mike’s condition declined he nonetheless remained committed to his team and to our collective success.  I personally feel very fortunate to have known Mike even for a short time as his quiet, effective style provided a great example for all of us.  Our thoughts and prayers are with Mike, his partner and family during this difficult time — he will be dearly missed.  Service and other details will be forthcoming shortly.

Roy

J. Roy Pottle
Chairman & Chief Executive Officer
American Messaging Services, LLC

-------- Response --------

From: tomcook@tlcpmc.com
Subject: RE: FW: Mike Montague
Date: August 27, 2015 at 6:18:48 PM CDT
To: “Roy Pottle” Roy.Pottle@americanmessaging.net

Roy: I appreciate your kind words which describe Mike to a tee. One of the great pleasures I experienced during the many years in business has been interacting with the many wonderful and gifted associates I had surrounding me. Mike was at the top of the list and there was simply no challenge he was not willing to take on and solve. He was extremely talented and possessed unique skills, but most importantly was the respect and understanding he displayed towards our staff, customers and vendors. Mike was a professional in every meaning of the word. His outside interest was traveling to far away lands exploring archaeological ruins and history, and he could speak several languages very well. Mike was a very humble and private man . . . it is very sad to lose someone like him so early. I know he will be admired and remembered by all of us who were fortunate enough to have spent time with him.

Very best,
Tom  


UNTIL NEXT WEEK

The Wireless Messaging News
 

Current member or former member of these organizations.


Best regards,
brad's signature
Newsletter Editor
73 DE K9IQY
Licensed 57 years

Brad Dye
P.O. Box 266
Fairfield, IL 62837 USA

mensa member

If you are curious about why I joined Mensa, click here

U.S. Navy
Radioman

radioman second class
Second Class
Petty Officer

American
Radio

arrl
Relay
League

A Public Library of
animated gif
Paging Information

cmma

European Mobile Messaging Association
emma logo
Former Board Member

ZP5TQ
radio club paraguay
Radio Club
of Paraguay

Quarter Century qcwa k9iqy
Wireless Association

Back To Paging
pagerman
Still The Most Reliable Wireless Protocol For Emergencies!
CONTACT INFO & LINKS  

Skype: braddye
Twitter: @BradDye1
Telephone: +1-618-599-7869
E–mail: brad@braddye.com
Wireless: Consulting page
Paging: Home Page
Marketing & Engineering Papers
K9IQY: Ham Radio Page

Institute of Electrical and
ieee
Electronics Engineers

Wireless
wireless logo medium
Messaging

Radio Club
radio club of america
of America

Life is good!

I am a person in
long-term recovery.


THOUGHTS FOR THE WEEK

Pay It Forward

Pay it forward is an expression for describing the beneficiary of a good deed repaying it to others instead of to the original benefactor. ( Wikipedia )

Ralph Waldo Emerson , in his 1841 essay Compensation , wrote: “In the order of nature we cannot render benefits to those from whom we receive them, or only seldom. But the benefit we receive must be rendered again, line for line, deed for deed, cent for cent, to somebody.”


PHOTO OF THE WEEK

My New Radio Project Is Working

K9IQY

Professor Joe Taylor is a man that I have the greatest respect for. He is an American astrophysicist who won a Nobel Prize for his discovery (with Russell Alan Hulse) of a “new type of pulsar, a discovery that has opened up new possibilities for the study of gravitation.”

My current project is an experiment with radio communications using a program that he invented, and made freely available to amateur radio operators. It is called “WSPR” (Weak Signal Propagation Reporter) and it uses the technology that he used to explore outer space, and win the Nobel Prize. WSPR is pronounced “whisper” which is very appropriate for weak radio signals.

When I start a new project, sometimes I get a little obsessive/compulsive with it. I also get frustrated when it doesn't go right at the beginning — but I am learning to keep trying until the big payoff comes at the end when it finally works right. That sense of satisfaction makes all the work worthwhile. Some of the folks around here think I am a “mad scientist.” My secret is that I am just mad. Anyway, here is a map showing how far my new low-powered radio station (K9IQY) transmitted yesterday on a short test with just one watt.

Each station, on the map above, has a transceiver (transmitter/receiver) so when they receive the signal that I transmit, on their receiver, their computer automatically uploads a signal report to the Internet web page where the map is, so that anyone can see the results. It's all about checking “propagation” or how well the radio bands are working at a given time, date, and frequency.

Technically, it is difficult to implement. The time on my computer has to be exact. Not just close, but right on. This is done with a little GPS receiver (dongle) outside, on the roof of my garage that connects to and corrects my computer's clock every few minutes. This is important so that all stations involved in reporting can send and receive at exactly-coordinated times. The radio frequencies used have to be exact as well. These weak signals are sent very slowly; that, and some creative-error-correcting software, are the reasons why it works so well over very long distances.

Below is a Propagation Map from today.

Source: http://wsprnet.org/


Home Page Directory Consulting Newsletters Free Subscription Products Reference Glossary Send e-mail